Jump to content

Dean Windass admits to attempting suicide last week.


PompeyVillan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Link

Dean Windass has admited he attempted suicide earlier this month after battling with alcohol and depression following his retirement two years ago.

The 42-year-old former Hull, Bradford, Middlesbrough and Aberdeen striker's professional career spanned 19 seasons.

Windass, who scored the goal that fired his home town club Hull into the top flight in 2008, told The People: "I have cried every day for two years.

"I took an overdose and, when that didn't work, I tried to hang myself."

Despite earning more than £500,000 a year at the height of his fame, Windass, who also helped Bradford win promotion to the Premier League (scoring 86 goals in two spells with the Bantams), said most of his money was now gone.

His 18-year marriage has broken up and, with little income and grieving for his recently deceased father John, he decided to take his own life.

"People outside football think we have it all," he said. "But I was in a hole that I honestly didn't know how to get out of.

"Just over a week ago, I hit rock bottom and decided to end it all.

"I need to sort myself out which is why I'm speaking out now. It's part of me getting better - part of the healing process.

"People have this image of me as this big strong man who can take anything life throws at him. But I'm not ashamed to say I wanted to end it after a string of setbacks.

"I knew I'd been a fool but I couldn't shake off the depression at feeling what a failure I'd become."

His first attempt was thwarted by a former girlfriend who turned up after he had tried to overdose on tablets.

The following day he tried to hang himself with a bedsheet.

"I tied it to a handrail at the top of the stairs but it was too long," he added.

"I was quite drunk and couldn't get it to work, so I got a belt instead. At that point a friend came round so I couldn't go through with it.

"We're not the brightest but you play football all your life. There are hundreds of footballers in the same boat. There is nothing to get up for in the morning.

"The Professional Footballers' Association or the governing body need to help us. I have hurt the people closest to me, so I've come out today and admitted I need help."

Poor guy and good on him for admitting it and making the issue more widespread. Young footballers need more life coaching 'cus there seems to be quite a few that can't deal with the reality of everyday life without football when they retire.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These players get shit financial advice, and end up buying multiple homes and 3 luxury cars, holidays overseas 3 times a year, invest in restaurants and other risky schemes....and then they wonder where it all went.

Financial ruin will drive a lot of people to the edge. I'm glad he came to his senses and is asking for help. Maybe Hull or Bradford can give him some kind of position at their clubs...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why can't ex-footballers just get a job and get on with life like the rest of us ?

I feel for Dean but he's had a lucky life, far better than most get and now he must get a grip and move on

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why can't ex-footballers just get a job and get on with life like the rest of us ?

Because there's a large number of "the rest of us" that aren't able to get jobs. Footballers often don't go into higher education as they're picked up by clubs at a young age and they work towards making a career out of that. Bad advice can leave footballers with no education, no money and no job after they retire. They have been 'lucky', but I don't think it's quite as easy to just get on with it, as you put it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of them do. You have to appreciate there are thousands of ex footballers out there, and like any cross section of society some of them are going to try to kill themselves. It might be a cold way of looking at things, but hand wringing and looking for one solution to solve all the problems of blokes who have to adapt to a massive change in lifestyle once they stop playing is unrealistic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why can't ex-footballers just get a job and get on with life like the rest of us ?

I feel for Dean but he's had a lucky life, far better than most get and now he must get a grip and move on

These type of "get a grip" comments whilst understandable are incredibly naive and verge on stupidity.

It doesnt matter how much money he has or doesn't have he can still be prone to mental illness or depression like anyone can if he is wired up that way.

Things like depression are not just a case of sulking too much and having a bad lifestyle (tho obviously that doesn't help) .

The bloke is obviously troubled if he tried to kill himself .

No offense but you must have had very sheltered life if do not know of a relative or friend who has had bad depression or been suicidal. Its not always for specific reasons - let alone material wealth.

Whilst he doesn't deserve more sympathy than anyone else i dont see why the need to vaguely ridicule him either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's blown his fortune and now feels down about it ??

I'm sorry if I don't have a great deal of sympathy, millions of people have it much tougher than dean and won't get the help/support he'll get now

I wish him a speedy recovery

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's blown his fortune and now feels down about it ??

I'm sorry if I don't have a great deal of sympathy, millions of people have it much tougher than dean and won't get the help/support he'll get now

I wish him a speedy recovery

You forgot about the breakup of his marriage and his dad dying...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's blown his fortune and now feels down about it ??

I'm sorry if I don't have a great deal of sympathy, millions of people have it much tougher than dean and won't get the help/support he'll get now

I wish him a speedy recovery

Thing is, when people realise depression is a mental illness more people will find it easier to admit they need help and seek it asap. It's all about raising awareness

With all due respect to you, I think you comparing depression with 'feeling down' a bit ignorant to be honest.

Anyway, as you say, I wish him a speedy recovery

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have to say I can kinda say CI's point in a way. I've battled depression and been suicidal many times as well as losing both parents before the age of 30 (my dad passing 2 weeks ago) and people in the street don't get the same support and help a professional footballer or celebrity would.

Having said that though, To go from having 30,000 people chant your name and being a star to go from nothing is as big a culture shock as they come and is something we'll never understand and when your factor in his personal tragedy then it's totally understandable. Ex-pro's need support and it's good to see it in the open but it needs to come from a football/celebrity angle as the man in the street just can't comprehend the battles they face.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

exclamation-mark-man-user-icon-with-png-and-vector-format-227727.png

Ad Blocker Detected

This site is paid for by ad revenue, please disable your ad blocking software for the site.

Â