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olboydave

Gym Routine

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Here's my stat sheet:

I'm 46

185 lbs

5'-10"

Beer gut and weak upper body strength. I have good torso proportion with good natural definition. I'm lucky that way. But if I don't smarten up, I'll start really looking my age.

Using weights every other day. Doing 30lbs-75lbs on biceps, chest, triceps, lats, shoulders. Lotta reps. Can't do abs cuz my lower back. I'm not strong enough to do challenging weights, plus I have arthritis in my joints. So this suits me. I'm only trying to burn fat and gain definition, not mass.

I'll do legs once a week.

And every day I'll ride the stationary bike 5 miles on medium difficulty. I'm pouring sweat after. Then I'll walk for a mile to strengthen my sprained peroneal tendon.

I'm really enjoying this routine, hope I stay injury free.

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I lost 16 kg between July 1 and mid September. More than I needed to, but it left me room to bulk up and add a little muscle while trying not to add the fat back on. I’ve been doing stronglifts since then and progressed nicely, even if my weight has remained surprisingly steady at 88 kg. My muscle mass has increased but the fat percentage has, to the naked eye at least, kept falling. I was really happy with all of that, which is why I’m now in a bit of a pickle: 

Yesterday, I did my lower back with some poor form deadlifts after two weeks off because of a nasty cold. I’m in quite a bit of pain and have concluded I can’t do squats, deadlifts or rows again until my back is better. Judging by the pain I’m in today, that might take a while. 

So now what? I want to keep working on my chest and shoulders, so hopefully bench press and shoulder press is still on. Should I take up cardio work again, which was on hold while I was doing squats three times a week? and add some stretching/agility drills? Or do I simply wait a few days and start from scratch while focusing on proper form? 

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A new low in my gym?

A pair of absolute numpties using the Smith machine to leg press :crylaugh:. Lying on their backs on the floor and pushing the bar away from them. Hugely complicated set-up with one of the them having to unrack the bar and other catching it in his foot arches. Not sure what’s wrong with the three different leg presses that we’ve got here...

It’s one the stupidest things I’ve ever seen in the gym and the sort of thing that normally ends up as a meme!

EDIT: One of them nearly got the disaster his idiocy deserved - he didn’t position the bar properly on his foot and it slipped down to his toes forcing him massively into dorsiflexion with the bar nearly falling on top of him! So close! I’d have pissed my pants laughing. 

Edited by JB
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Got a fitbit for Christmas so aiming for 10000 steps a day, alongside 3 sessions of circuit training a week at the gym.

Footall/Futsal will replace 1 of the sessions.

Down to 13 and a half stone at the moment but probably put on 2/3 pounds over Christmas. Aiming to be around 13 stone (I'm 6'3 so any lighter and I'll be a beanpole)

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Hit a PR deadlift today of 160kg. Pretty happy with that considering I only started to deadlift consistently about 4-5 months ago.

Can anyone shed some light on the differences between conventional and sumo? I've seen people lifting sumo and it appears to me that because they start with what looks like a wider stance they don't need to lift the bar as high compared to conventional?

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20 hours ago, sexbelowsound said:

Hit a PR deadlift today of 160kg. Pretty happy with that considering I only started to deadlift consistently about 4-5 months ago.

Can anyone shed some light on the differences between conventional and sumo? I've seen people lifting sumo and it appears to me that because they start with what looks like a wider stance they don't need to lift the bar as high compared to conventional?

Nice one on the PR. 200kg by the end of the year?

Sumo stance is a bit easier on the back, whereas conventional is a bit easier on the quads. Which a person prefers largely depends on the individual biomechanics, particularly hip structure. For example, sumo always felt more comfortable for me and conventional would ruin my lower back after a few weeks. Some people are stronger with straight-ahead hip flexion (conventional), whilst others are stronger with hip flexion with hip abduction (sumo). 

As you say, there’s a difference in the distance the bar travels between the two variations. It’s minimal but obviously can add up if deadlifting for reps. However, it generally isn’t significant when maxing out. Also, it’s often negated by taller lifters (who commonly do better with sumo) having to lift the bar further off the floor. Neither is really easier or harder. All the heaviest dead lifts of all time have been conventional. 

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14 minutes ago, JB said:

Nice one on the PR. 200kg by the end of the year?

Sumo stance is a bit easier on the back, whereas conventional is a bit easier on the quads. Which a person prefers largely depends on the individual biomechanics, particularly hip structure. For example, sumo always felt more comfortable for me and conventional would ruin my lower back after a few weeks. Some people are stronger with straight-ahead hip flexion (conventional), whilst others are stronger with hip flexion with hip abduction (sumo). 

As you say, there’s a difference in the distance the bar travels between the two variations. It’s minimal but obviously can add up if deadlifting for reps. However, it generally isn’t significant when maxing out. Also, it’s often negated by taller lifters (who commonly do better with sumo) having to lift the bar further off the floor. Neither is really easier or harder. All the heaviest dead lifts of all time have been conventional. 

Cheers mate. That's what i'm hoping for, If I can hit 180kg by the summer i'll be happy.

I'm going to try some Sumo deadlifts. I feel fine lifting conventional and I always feel slightly off balance lifting sumo but it's good to mix it up!

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I feel like I'm restarting again.

2017 goes down as my worst gym year since I started at the gym (as in properly started). So probably 4 or 5 years.

I'm determined that 2018 will go back to the way I was. Dedicated and making progress all the time. 
I've already avoided my usual Christmas blowout. Don't get me wrong, I still ate and drank a lot over xmas, but previous years I'd go absolutely mental for pretty much all of December, under the guise of "bulking".

That always meant the first few months of the following year would just be getting rid of that christmas weight.

This year I'm starting at a much better place.

 

So I'm back on Stronglifts to start. Going to do this for a couple of months until I plateau and then move to either a split, or maybe Madcow 5x5 as I've had good results on that before (I set PRs on that routine years ago that I've never beaten since!)

 

The OH has also quit the gym, which will work wonders for me! Sounds harsh, but together we were terrible for skipping sessions. It would only take one of us to hint that we didn't fancy the gym and the other would buckle. And we'd justify it to ourselves. 
So that's another obstacle out of the way :D 

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Also, bought some new scales as my other ones were playing up a bit. A set of these fancy electronic analyser things that syncs with your phone.

Stepped on. 

They told me I was 37% bodyfat :crylaugh: 

They're getting sent back.

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