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Are CDs Dead ?


hippo
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As a fan of most things 60s - especially northern soul , R n B. I much prefer to pick up CDs @£3 a pop - than a monthly subscription to Spotify .

When I forked out for a new cd player this week I got a response "have we gone back to 1990" 

I still like CDs !

*It's got usb and BT in case I change my mind !

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They never lived for me. I held on with vinyl for so long digital started to appear, so I skipped over CDs entirely. Don't own any or a player. I download what I want into my own library though, don't pay for any subscription services.

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3 minutes ago, hippo said:

As a fan of most things 60s - especially northern soul , R n B. I much prefer to pick up CDs @£3 a pop - than a monthly subscription to Spotify .

When I forked out for a new cd player this week I got a response "have we gone back to 1990" 

I still like CDs !

*It's got usb and BT in case I change my mind !

I have a preference for vinyl but I still buy CDs, bought one this week as it happens

Some music I cant justify paying vinyl prices for, some I can

 

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3 minutes ago, bickster said:

Some music I cant justify paying vinyl prices for, some I can

 

See, that's where Spotify shines for me. It's for the music I want to listen to, that I don't want to splurge on. I get vinyl copies of either albums that are quite meaningful to me, or that I just love the presentation of. Everything else is digital. Same with books - I get a nice hardcover copy of books I love and want to have pride of place on my shelves, everything else goes on to the kindle, I don't want mediocre stuff cluttering up my shelves.

I have no use case for CDs, blu-rays, physical copies of games or paperback books at all.

Edited by Davkaus
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CDs remain my main source of music purchase as I can listen to them a multiple way and think it is generally the most accessible. I buy vinyl for the special releases or something that I think will sound really good on vinyl. I tried Spotify the last few months but honestly never used it. If I want to check a band out, I normally go to youtube but if I like it, I would normally then go and buy the CD to properly listen to the band. 

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Fair enough, I am a minimalist, so we won't see eye to eye on this one :D

I appreciate they earn less money from streaming, that's why I go to as many gigs as I can and usually buy a tee as well.

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1 minute ago, Davkaus said:

Fair enough, I am a minimalist, so we won't see eye to eye on this one :D

I appreciate they earn less money from streaming, that's why I go to as many gigs as I can and usually buy a tee as well.

Thats a perfectly reasonable position, there are many ways to reward the artist

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1 minute ago, cyrusr said:

CDs remain my main source of music purchase as I can listen to them a multiple way and think it is generally the most accessible. I buy vinyl for the special releases or something that I think will sound really good on vinyl. I tried Spotify the last few months but honestly never used it. If I want to check a band out, I normally go to youtube but if I like it, I would normally then go and buy the CD to properly listen to the band. 

To me Spotify encourages cherry picking. You play the songs you like.

Whack a cd one waiting for it to click around to your favourite - you discover other tracks. 

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I love CDs, I think vinyl is an absurd anachronism, and I find Spotify quite useful in its place. 

As for books, I still buy hardbacks and paperbacks, but also download the occasional Kindle book. 

Magazines, however, have been almost completely displaced by Readly. 

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I buy CDs if I know they will be listened to in the car. I buy vinyl mainly though, but the norm for me is an album that is from the 70s and costs a max of £2. I also stream music, usually when I am washing up. 

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Spotify has killed any form of physical musical media for me. The fact that it has basically every song on it is a big part of that - if it were more fragmented like tv / film I might want physical copies (because you never know when something might disappear from Netflix), but thankfully that doesn’t seem the case with music.

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4 minutes ago, Panto_Villan said:

The fact that it has basically every song on it is a big part of that - i

This isn't remotely true

5 minutes ago, Panto_Villan said:

(because you never know when something might disappear from Netflix), but thankfully that doesn’t seem the case with music.

This isn't remotely true either

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Just now, bickster said:

This isn't remotely true

This isn't remotely true either

I’m not a music nerd, I can only speak from my experience of using it. There’s very few songs I’ve looked for that I’ve not been able to find, and even fewer that have disappeared from my playlists. That’s killed physical music media for me.

But even not being a music nerd, I stand by my claim that music streaming is way less fragmented than film / tv is.

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Different media for different situations IMO. My favourite way of listening to music is still listening to the entire album end-to-end, on vinyl, CD or digital download, with the added occasionally joy of finding that a track you didn't instantly take to at first slowly grows on you after a couple of listenings. For me, streaming is for when I'm on my phone (car, bus, train) and for checking out new artists/albums.  I still have my old vinyl collection, mostly for those old oddities that I haven't found available on CD or legal streaming services, or for when the only available CD release turns out to be "with added bonus tracks" or even worse: "re-mastered" and turns out to be hideously compressed in the process. New(ish) albums that I really like, I buy. On CD.

(Edit: saw bicksters post. When I really, *really* want to listen to music or watch a movie more than once, I want to own a physical copy.)

Edited by TB
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21 minutes ago, bickster said:

This isn't remotely true

Maybe for more obscure music, but for stuff I like - older rock, indie stuff, a whole range of 'popular' music, there is very little missing when I search Spotify

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I listen to all my music on Spotify. I have a box of CDs somewhere. In a storage unit I think!

No CDs in my flat. No DVDs either. Plenty of books though, although they are all legacy ones, haven't purchased a new physical book in about 10 years. 

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I buy more CDs than vinyl. Partly because my CD player is the best quality stereo component I have, so I get the best sound from them. Vinyl I do buy, sometimes because the artist doesn't release a CD of an album, but more often for particular artists where I either want to support them by giving them more money for their album, or because like a few have said the artefact itself is more appealing than a CD in a crappy sleeve.

Streaming I only use to decide if I want to buy an album in either format - listen to tracks I haven't heard. If it turns out there's just one track on it I like, the one I've heard on the radio, or seen on here or YouTube, then I'll pay for a download.

But no, they're not dead (yet) and probably never will be - I mean cassettes are a thing, again, with the hippysters, FFS.

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