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20mph speed limits


Morkery
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18840110

I'm not against road safety, and do not dislike children but these 20mph limits are really annoying.

The people who actually speed in 30 zones are unlikely to change and why can't the schools control their own crossings?

Or would that be too much to expect from one teacher!

The idea that the limit change can reduce incidents by 60% is probably true, but you could probably achieve 80% by getting everyone on penny farthings.

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There are quite a few of those where I live already (Nuneaton) including one which is almost a mile long and appears to be there because of the sheer number of parked cars on the street rather than any child safety issues (there are no schools nearby and houses are only on one side of the road for a stretch of it) but absolutely nobody respects them. The long 20 limit has been there for about fifteen years too, personally I think the police treat it as a strict 30. They know that people will drive at 30 in a 20, but they also know that people will drive at 35 in a 30. What is the best way of getting people to stick to 30 like glue? Make it a 20.

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This should get you all foaming at the mouth:

Speed limits on many rural roads in England could be cut from 60mph to 40mph under government proposals.

The reduction should be considered by councils on roads with "many bends or junctions", the Department for Transport (DfT) says in draft guidance.

Some 49% of road deaths in 2010 in the UK took place on single carriageway rural roads with a 60mph speed limit.

Road Safety Minister Mike Penning said it was "vital that speed limits are suitable for local conditions".

The vast majority of rural single-carriageway roads are subject to the national speed limit of 60mph.

Under the plans, which are open to public consultation, a reduction to 40mph should also be considered where there is "substantial development" or where there are "a considerable number" of horse-riders, pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists.

A reduction to 50mph would be considered for "lower quality A and B roads" with "a relatively high number" of bends or junctions and where mean speeds are already below 50mph.

DfT figures for 2010 show that 68% of road deaths in Britain took place on rural roads.

Ralph Smyth, from the Campaign to Protect Rural England, called for "a presumption that minor rural roads, the narrower winding ones, have a lower speed limit".

"It seems strange that you've got minor roads, often that are just tarmaced tracks, that have a speed limit of 60mph - just 10mph less than the motorways," he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

He said councils could already reduce limits on such roads but that they were legally obliged to erect expensive "repeater" signs along the way.

"We're saying a much better solution would be to use 40mph zones, similar to the 20mph zones in urban areas, where there isn't the requirement to have the signs every few hundred metres.

"And, of course, that doesn't just mean less cost it means less clutter in the countryside," he added.

He said drivers should also be educated that "these are different to the other sorts of roads they use, almost like a separate network where you could expect to find someone walking their dog, a cyclist or some livestock around the next blind bend".

'Top priority'

Milly Wastie, vice-chairwoman of the National Federation of Young Farmers' Clubs, meanwhile, said raising awareness about driving conditions in rural areas was key to reducing accidents.

"I think instead of lowering the speeds on rural roads it's more about education and awareness and I think it's how to drive and how to manage different driving conditions," she told Today.

"You're only starting to learn how to handle these conditions when you pass your test and, from a young person's point of view, obviously we're the most at risk."

Under the new guidelines, English councils will also be given more freedom to introduce 20mph speed limits as well as to use variable speed limits outside schools.

The DfT says there are about 2,000 of the 20mph schemes in England; it cites research suggesting they can reduce collisions and injuries by 60%.

A new online speed limit appraisal tool will help councils to assess the benefits and costs of such schemes.

"Road safety is a top priority and the guidance will help councils make evidence-based decisions to introduce local speed limits that reflect the needs of all road users," Road Safety Minister Mr Penning said.

No changes are planned to the national speed limits of 30mph on street-lit roads, 60mph on single carriageway roads and 70mph on dual carriageways and motorways.

In Northern Ireland, the Department for Regional Development's Roads Service has the powers to introduce local speed limits where national limits are deemed inappropriate.

And policy in Wales is covered by guidance for local authorities published by the Welsh Assembly in October 2009 which, among other things, aimed to extend 20mph zones.

The Scottish government was given devolved powers under the Scotland Act, introduced in May, to set its own speed limits.

There has been pressure from campaigners to introduce 50mph limits for many rural roads and 20mph limits for all towns and cities, but plans for changes have yet to be announced.

BBC

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I have no problem with the speed limit being decreased on single lane country roads , especially ones with many bends and enclosed by tall hedgerows. For me they are more dangerous than the motorway .

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I have no problem with the speed limit being decreased on single lane country roads , especially ones with many bends and enclosed by tall hedgerows. For me they are more dangerous than the motorway .

Yeah I've never understood it either, especially with the boy racers you get who treat country lanes as there own rally course.

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I can drive safely
Translation: I haven't had an accident yet.

Everybody who HAS had one probably said the same thing.

Most drivers describe themselves as "better than average". Spot the fatal flaw.

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You can never introduce laws that will stop idiot drivers. I think a 60mph limit on most country roads is fine (Obviously there are some that are clearly not fit for n.speed limit|)

Most accidents near me are down to people not reading the road signs and also not driving to the conditions - weather & road.

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Dominant eye in most humans is the right, therefore driving on the left makes more sense. It's a very marginal call however.

The historical truth though goes back to medieval times, you walked on the left because you carried your sword on the right. this convention continued throughout the world until Napoleon, left handed short arsed dictator decreed that the French would do the opposite. So the French colonies did it on the right from thereon in.

Blame the French for driving on the right!

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Whatever about schools. There's a section of road near where I work that joins a national road (i.e. one down from a motorway) onto a motorway and the link road is 30km/h. Yes. 18mph to go from the 2nd biggest road to the biggest road and I assure you it is nowhere near any pedestrian of any age. But our lot are just idiots. If you actually DID 18mph on that bit you would cause an accident. And yet if they were of a mind to, the police could sit there and do every person that used it for 'speeding'. A completely inappropriate and dangerous speed limit.

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Why not go the whole hog and make it compulsory to have a man waving a flag walking 60 yards in front of the car as well

30 mph is safe enough no need to lower it

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I have no problem with the speed limit being decreased on single lane country roads , especially ones with many bends and enclosed by tall hedgerows. For me they are more dangerous than the motorway .

Having just completed a Speed Awareness Course I'm pleased to confirm you are right.

4% accicdents on motorways

22% Urban

74% Urban non-motorway.

Country roads full of dickheads driving at 60 "because thats the limit" rather than considering what is safe/appropriate.

:thumb:

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I can drive safely on the rural roads I know at national speed limit. Don't see the need.

I wish I had the chance to get up to that. I must average 35mph a day due to tractors....

Yep, and slowpokes.

I drive through a lot of rural lanes on myw ay to and from work, and I never usually get too close to getting towards the national speed limit, due to slow pokes.

OK, you can carry out an overtake, in some places, but the roads aren't really conducive to that, and it can be a bit risky. So you often have to go at the speed of the slowpoke, whoh are often scared/shit drivers who can't go any faster.

So I don't think reducing the limit will have any real impact. Boy racers and slowpokes will still go at the same speed whatever.

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I can drive safely on the rural roads I know at national speed limit. Don't see the need.

I wish I had the chance to get up to that. I must average 35mph a day due to tractors....

Yep, and slowpokes.

I drive through a lot of rural lanes on myw ay to and from work, and I never usually get too close to getting towards the national speed limit, due to slow pokes.

OK, you can carry out an overtake, in some places, but the roads aren't really conducive to that, and it can be a bit risky. So you often have to go at the speed of the slowpoke, whoh are often scared/shit drivers who can't go any faster.

So I don't think reducing the limit will have any real impact. Boy racers and slowpokes will still go at the same speed whatever.

The 'slowpokes' are probably simply non-locals. I'm happy to up the speed on rural roads when I'm familiar with them, but sometimes I'm not, and I take it slower - that's when I get irate locals (hi Jon) tailgating behind me and overtaking dangerously through impatience. Fact is, you never know what's around the next bend, even when you know that road quite well.

Chill.

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I can drive safely on the rural roads I know at national speed limit. Don't see the need.

I wish I had the chance to get up to that. I must average 35mph a day due to tractors....

Yep, and slowpokes.

I drive through a lot of rural lanes on myw ay to and from work, and I never usually get too close to getting towards the national speed limit, due to slow pokes.

OK, you can carry out an overtake, in some places, but the roads aren't really conducive to that, and it can be a bit risky. So you often have to go at the speed of the slowpoke, whoh are often scared/shit drivers who can't go any faster.

So I don't think reducing the limit will have any real impact. Boy racers and slowpokes will still go at the same speed whatever.

The 'slowpokes' are probably simply non-locals.

Stick to the 'main' roads then! :mrgreen: 'Lost' drivers on narrow country lanes can be a 'mare too.

I do make allowance for people that 'don't know the roads' (to a degree) but if they are going that slowly, they really should pull over and find their bearings, rather than drive at 20 mph and thus hold other vehicles up.

Drivers that lack confidence (and thus drive slowly/badly) :rant:

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