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Goal line technology


Nigel
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Looks like the long awaited introduction of this is being started tonight when they test it out during tonights Hampshire FA Senior Cup final at St Mary’s Stadium.

I really can not believe how long this has taken, what was wrong with doing this 10 years ago?

Shows how much Fifa have their fingers on the pulse!

The goal-line technology which could consign debatable decisions to the dustbin will take a major step towards approval when it is tested in match conditions for the first time during the Hampshire FA Senior Cup final at St Mary’s Stadium on Wednesday.

Eastleigh and Totton, on rungs six and seven of the football league ladder, find themselves cast as guinea pigs for the Hawk-Eye system bidding to pass a rigorous selection process and earn authorisation from the FIFA committee in charge of the game’s laws at a special meeting on July 2.

British company Hawk-Eye and German-backed GoalRef are the only remaining options after six others were deemed unsuitable following the first stage of testing, which ended last December.

On Thursday, the second phase of Hawk-Eye testing began at St Mary’s, usefully close to the UK headquarters of Sony, owner of Hawk-Eye, with balls fired at a wooden wall placed behind the goal line at speeds of up to 75mph. Today it will be assessed using players in a training session before advancing to the game on May 16.

The Hawk-Eye system places seven high-speed cameras at each goalmouth and, as in tennis and cricket, triangulates the exact position of the ball. By contrast, GoalRef inserts an aerial, described as three bands, inside the ball and creates a magnetic field between the posts. In each, the referee is alerted to whether the ball has crossed the line by a watch which flashes ‘goal’ and vibrates.

Both systems will subsequently undergo lab tests, to see how they fare in different climates, as well as being used in two live matches. In those matches the results are reserved for representatives from EMPA, the independent examiners carrying out testing on behalf of FIFA, and will not be accessible by the referee.

If both systems match the criteria set out by FIFA, they should be granted approval in a vote by the International Football Association Board (IFAB) during a special meeting on July 2, expected to take place in Kiev. The English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish FAs each have a vote, while FIFA has four, with a 75 per cent agreement needed to ensure a change to football’s rules.

It would then be up to individual leagues and competitions to decide which goal-line technology, if any, to opt for. Given the time required for cost, licensing and installation to be worked out it appears highly likely the 2012-13 Premier League season would come too soon. The 2013 Major League Soccer season, which starts next March, could be the first to use the technology and MLS commissioner Don Garber has said he wants to ‘as soon as it is made available’.

Hampshire FA chief executive Neil Cassar said yesterday: ‘We are proud to be selected to be part of football history.’

Instances of tight goal-line decisions seem to have increased recently, with the 'ghost' goal awarded against Tottenham in the FA Cup semi-final and then Andy Carroll's header in the final, correctly not given, being cited as reasons for the need to introduce technology.

Hawk-Eye is believed to cost around £250,000 to install at each stadium, the top-end of prices for the systems which originally applied, but managing director Steve Carter, made his company’s case by saying: ‘I’m very proud of our technology, we’ve got a record which speaks for itself. I’m absolutely sure it works.

‘The benefit of being camera-based is that we don’t do anything to the ball. We can also provide a video replay which explains the system.’

Ingmar Bretz, described as project leader at GoalRef said: ‘We have not fixed a cost yet but we expect our price to be significantly lower (than Hawk-Eye). There is also ease of installation.

‘Everything installed is around the goal with just some preparation of the goalline, installing a wire, the posts.

‘I want the world to take up our system. I think the Premier League has some political criteria. If they prefer to take a political decision, that is up to them but I hope the facts will decide.’

Neale Barry, head of senior referee development at the FA and IFAB member, added: ‘I haven’t come across a referee who’s not in favour of goal-line technology. Sometimes a referee needs the technology to be absolutely sure.

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Was initially dead against goal line technology. There would be nothing worse than waiting for video technology to confirm a goal, football's not broke, and it doesn't need fixing.

However, the proposed technology means that the referee will know almost immediately if the ball has crossed the line, which can only be a good thing.

That said, I still think it's over the top. There are only one or two incorrect decisions annually that would be rectified by introducing goal line technology, while far, far more goals are incorrectly awarded/disallowed due to offside decisions etc.

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Bit OT but I was thinking with the advance technology and GPRS (I think) wouldn’t it be easy to place microchips in boots and the offside process would be a lot easier to manage. A simple programme calculating when an opponent is between the last two players could set a trigger off. Maybe I’m looking at it too simplistically but in my head it sounds perfectly feasible.

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I agree Shillzz, however this has to be seen as the start of what it can offer rather than the final solution.

A good, but horribly belated decision IMO!

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Bit OT but I was thinking with the advance technology and GPRS (I think) wouldn’t it be easy to place microchips in boots and the offside process would be a lot easier to manage. A simple programme calculating when an opponent is between the last two players could set a trigger off. Maybe I’m looking at it too simplistically but in my head it sounds perfectly feasible.

But to the letter of the law, your feet can be onside and your head can be offside.

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football's not broke, and it doesn't need fixing.

I completely disagree. Football is broken because:

1. It all about money, whoever has the most wins the trophies and gets the best players.

2. The "Champions" League.

3. Corrupt, incompotent buffoons run the game.

4. Cheating is actively encouraged in the sport. (If someone touches you, dive, win a free kick and people won't condemn you for diving because "there was contact". Touching somone isn't a foul.)

5. The Monopoly of the Top clubs in the big leagues, especially Spain.

6. Diving.

7. The fact that video evidence isn't used to retrospectively correct mistakes.

8. Joey Barton.

9. Player Power.

10. The number of times physio runs onto a pitch compared to the number of times he is actually needed to do anything remotely related to medical treatment.

There are about 20 different things that football needs to fix that are more important than goal line technology yet people talk about it like its a panacea to correct all of footballs myriad of ills. How many games in the premier league would have actually been affected had goal line technology been in place last season?

I believe it will come in, It will be hyped up and sponsored by god knows who and then people will realise that its actually used **** all times and makes shag all difference. Sky will still tell us its the greatest thing since Player cam though.

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With regard to the tech that is being talked about for this - is it going to be implemented for the goal line only, or all boundaries of the pitch? I'd hope it was the latter, if it's going to be done they may as well do the job properly. I'm not suggesting that there are replays and decisions for whose corner/throw-in it is, just simply whether the ball has gone out of play or not. It might be mentioned in the text above, but tl;dr

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Doing it for all boundaries would be much more complicated, I think.

If it takes 7 high speed cameras per goal and £250,000, imagine the cost opf doing it on every touchline too?

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Doing it for all boundaries would be much more complicated, I think.

If it takes 7 high speed cameras per goal and £250,000, imagine the cost opf doing it on every touchline too?

You do not need 7 high speed cameras and £250,000 to determine whether the whole of the ball is over the whole of the line. It's a shame the GoalRef monetary vaule isn't quoted in the article, but the fact it is 'significantly less' is hardly surprising.

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Doing it for all boundaries would be much more complicated, I think.

If it takes 7 high speed cameras per goal and £250,000, imagine the cost opf doing it on every touchline too?

You do not need 7 high speed cameras and £250,000 to determine whether the whole of the ball is over the whole of the line.

Well you do if it's hawkeye, according to the article.

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Bit OT but I was thinking with the advance technology and GPRS (I think) wouldn’t it be easy to place microchips in boots and the offside process would be a lot easier to manage. A simple programme calculating when an opponent is between the last two players could set a trigger off. Maybe I’m looking at it too simplistically but in my head it sounds perfectly feasible.

But to the letter of the law, your feet can be onside and your head can be offside.

They should change the rule then, having ur head/shoulder/knob ahead of the last defender really wouldnt be that much of a problem.

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  • 9 months later...
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What ever happened to GLT being introduced?  

 

 

Was just watching the Chelsea game thinking how useless the refs behind the goals were and it got me thinking about it.  I seem to remember something about this being introduced (or trialed) half way through this season.

Edited by Nigel
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What ever happened to this?

I seem to remember something about this being introduced (or trialed) half way through this season.

It will be in the premier.league across all 20 teams next season, the leagues below will can have it if they fund it, basically like under soil heating.

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What ever happened to this?

I seem to remember something about this being introduced (or trialed) half way through this season.

It will be in the premier.league across all 20 teams next season, the leagues below will can have it if they fund it, basically like under soil heating.

Must have missed this. Was it ever meant to be bought in half way through this season or was i dreaming?

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What ever happened to this?

I seem to remember something about this being introduced (or trialed) half way through this season.

It will be in the premier.league across all 20 teams next season, the leagues below will can have it if they fund it, basically like under soil heating.
Must have missed this. Was it ever meant to be bought in half way through this season or was i dreaming?

It was trialed through the world club champs

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