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Costa Concordia


PauloBarnesi
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Not sure this has been discussed elsewhere, but I am still amazed at this. One just doesn’t expect this kind of disaster to happen in calm seas. Its staggering what happened, and it certainly doesn’t look that the captain did his duty. Its lucky that we are looking at so few deaths. It could have easily been in the hundreds if not thousands.

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Not sure this has been discussed elsewhere, but I am still amazed at this. One just doesn’t expect this kind of disaster to happen in calm seas. Its staggering what happened, and it certainly doesn’t look that the captain did his duty. Its lucky that we are looking at so few deaths. It could have easily been in the hundreds if not thousands.

There is so much starting to come out about this but I am certain there is worse to come.

The life loss could so have been much worse and we all remember the Herald of Free enterprise.

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The life loss could so have been much worse and we all remember the Herald of Free enterprise.

What was staggering about that was that lessons weren’t learned leading to Estonia disaster in 1994, where the death toll reached nearly 1000

i don't remember that, what happened?

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Costa Concordia runs aground. 4000 evacuated, 3 dead. Judging by the pictures I'd say that's a good stat.

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Where do you begin getting that thing out of the water though to repair it?

First of all they will have to upright her (many tugs involved) then pull her back into open waters, again using the tugs. Whilst ensuring she is watertight and not likely to sink (highly unlikely she would sink though). They will then ballast her to make sure she is level to a certain degree.

From there she will be slowly towed to a dry dock for a survey of the damage, and someone from the insurance company along with surveyours will make a decision on the extent of the damage and repair involved.

You can bet your bottom dollar that the captain will find himself in court over it and will probably never captain a ship again though...

Shame, wonderful vessle.

Where do you begin getting that thing out of the water though to repair it?

First of all they will have to upright her (many tugs involved) then pull her back into open waters, again using the tugs. Whilst ensuring she is watertight and not likely to sink (highly unlikely she would sink though). They will then ballast her to make sure she is level to a certain degree.

From there she will be slowly towed to a dry dock for a survey of the damage, and someone from the insurance company along with surveyours will make a decision on the extent of the damage and repair involved.

You can bet your bottom dollar that the captain will find himself in court over it and will probably never captain a ship again though...

Shame, wonderful vessle.

It's a bloody massive hole. Mending that before setting her afloat will be quite a task.

hole1p.jpg

hole2a.jpg

They wont need to mend it mate, they will upright her and certain sectors of the bottom of the ship will fill with water (where the shell has been breached). They will make sure that all other areas are watertight with use of the watertight doors and bulkheads etc and she will float. The problem will be if the shell is split above the lower decks and looking at the photos it is no-where near them.

So uprighting her and getting her to float will not be a problem. Is not like the days of the Titanic anymore, ships are broken into segments/areas that can take on a massive amount of water without sinking. The ship wont just continue to fill with water until in sinks. It will take on water where the rip is, the compartments that are breached will fill up with water to the next deck up and to the forward and aft bulkheads that are watertight and she will then float.

The easiest way to imagine it would be to think of an empty 2 litre bottle, that has 20 different compartments all seperate from one another (horizontally and vertically, sit the bottle in water, it will float. Split the bottle at the bottom breaching 2-3 compartments and they would fill with water, the bottle will still float and as long as the dividing boundarys are not broken the bottle will stay afloat, ableit sit lower in the water.

This is how ships are designed, the shell can split and she will still float, although certaib areas of the ship will be full of water, it wont just fill with water completley until it sinks.

Ok, got it.

Any idea why she toppled over like that?

From the photos I would suggest the area that she grounded on is not level so she was already listing over to one side after she hit (like parking sideways on a hill), the water has gushed in with great force and filled the side that she was already leaning to (which would add more weight to that side) and she slowly started to topple/lean further to the point where she could not come back.

Oh man, some serious education here. Well written too.

Thanks villapark1. Fascinating stuff.

Thanks mate, only reason I know it is because I have worked in shipbuiding for nearly 20 years. Not because I am full of knowledge or a nerd or anything like that.

Ask me about history or other various subjects and I would be clueless...lol :oops:

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The life loss could so have been much worse and we all remember the Herald of Free enterprise.

What was staggering about that was that lessons weren’t learned leading to Estonia disaster in 1994, where the death toll reached nearly 1000

i don't remember that, what happened?

[url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/september/28/newsid_2542000/2542093.stm]A ferry ship sank in the baltic. It had design definciencies in its opening bow, poorly maintained and poor keeping of required regulations. Water started coming in through the bow, which wasn’t properly shut in poor weather. Ship took on water rapidly and sank extremely quickly in near freezing sea. I think it had something like 30 survivors and 852 deaths.

You can never make a ship unsinkable, but even with the best design human failings and the sea it self will make sinkings happen.

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Why are all boats female ?

Because they are always wet at the bottom! #thankyouverymuch.

I have been following this story loosely, but the captain of the ship is absolutely ****, isnt he? It seems he caused the crash by acting like a dickhead, then he abandoned ship and left his passengers to die. Isn't the captain supposed to be the last man off the ship, or is that just a British tradition? Either way, I dont think the captain should be on the first lifeboat away from the scene.

The transcript of the conversation between the captain and the coastguard is alarming to say the least, how can a man with an attitude like that be put in charge of the lives of thousands of people?

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It seems he caused the crash by acting like a dickhead

this is what has puzzled me though ..why didn't one of the senior officers question his orders and take over ... it is kind of accepted practise and there is precedent for it happening ... the captain would have had to send an order to change course he doesn't physically steer the ship himself

There is no legal requirement that says the captain has to be the last to leave the ship , but it does seem to be accepted practise ... TBH i alwasy assumed it was more from a salvage rights pov rather than a noble view

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cainecolor.jpg

This is the captain speaking. Some misguided sailors on this ship still think they can pull a fast one on me. Well, they're very much mistaken. Since you've taken this course, the innocent will be punished with the guilty. There will be no liberty for any member of this crew for three months. I will not be made a fool of! Do you hear me?
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It seems he caused the crash by acting like a dickhead

this is what has puzzled me though ..why didn't one of the senior officers question his orders and take over ... it is kind of accepted practise and there is precedent for it happening ... the captain would have had to send an order to change course he doesn't physically steer the ship himself

Apparently this is the ship doing the same "flyby" last year.

I wonder how many times the ship has done that? There is a bit about it in The Guardian with a map of where the ship is booked to go and the way it actually went. (click)

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