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'A shed load'


paddy
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I think the phrase shed-load comes from...  

51 members have voted

  1. 1. I think the phrase shed-load comes from...

    • the amount that would be in a load which is shed by a lorry, a shed load.
      25
    • the amount that fits into a shed, a shed load.
      27


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I'd never really thought about this until today when I heard a traffic report on the radio.

But I'd always assumed 'a shed load' (meaning a lot basically) was referring to a shed, as in the thing in your garden. Never considered that it might mean it as in the way a lorry might shed its load.

So what are the origins of it? Anyone know?

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I'd never really thought about this until today when I heard a traffic report on the radio.

But I'd always assumed 'a shed load' (meaning a lot basically) was referring to a shed, as in the thing in your garden. Never considered that it might mean it as in the way a lorry might shed its load.

So what are the origins of it? Anyone know?

:lol:

To 'shed' something is to part with something. For example, when a snake sheds it's skin.

The load, of whatever, has parted from the lorry so the load is 'shed'. It is therefore a 'shed load'.

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its two different things

On traffic reports its a shed load as in the load of a lorry shed over the ground

in the other sense its a shed full of stuff meaning lots

Tis a weird one though, exactly the same phrase with two completely different meanings. Context it appears is everything in this one

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brommy, you're misunderstanding the original post.

Paddy's asking if the origins of the expression 'shed load' - such as 'That guy has a shed load of crack' - comes from the expression used in reference to a lorry (for example) shedding its load, or just the idea of a (garden) shed full of stuff.

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brommy, you're misunderstanding the original post.

Paddy's asking if the origins of the expression 'shed load' - such as 'That guy has a shed load of crack' - comes from the expression used in reference to a lorry (for example) shedding its load, or just the idea of a (garden) shed full of stuff.

Are you sure? :? I think I understand Paddy's post more than yours! :lol: Where did the crack come from? :shock:

I've re-read the OP and bickster's reply covers both meanings:

1) losing a load

2) a large volume of something (perhaps enough to fill a (garden) shed).

Confusingly a lorry which has lost a large volume of something could be said to have 'shed a shed load'!

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I think Trog is right here in what Paddy's trying to ask.

We use the term a 'shed-load' for a lot of something, but also for a lorry losing it's load, Paddy to my mind is wondering if the term for a lot, is born of the idea of the amount a lorry might lose if it lost it's load.

I'm still standing by it being a polite version of shitload that just so happens to make sense as well thanks to a shed having space for a load of stuff.

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I've just seen the poll. How can I vote for both as 'shed load' can mean both? Context is the key!

The question is whether you think a shed load relates to the amount lost by a lorry or the amount you can fit in a shed. The literal meaning of a shed load is a given.

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I'm still standing by it being a polite version of shitload that just so happens to make sense as well thanks to a shed having space for a load of stuff.
Shitload is the impolite version of a shed load.

I''m absolutely in the "a shed-load of biscuits" meaning a lot of biscuits, say for example the amount a lorry might lose if it crashed and not "a shed-load of biscuits" as in the amount you might fit into a shed.
Is the correct answer.

The origin is pretty obvious to me "wow, that's a shed load of biscuits" would be the comment as you drove past it, hence "a shed load" would then be adopted to mean a lot.

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I've just seen the poll. How can I vote for both as 'shed load' can mean both? Context is the key!

The question is whether you think a shed load relates to the amount lost by a lorry or the amount you can fit in a shed. The literal meaning of a shed load is a given.

If a traffic report annouces a 'shed load' I think it relates to a load that has fell off (or shed from) the lorry, (large or small - it's holding up traffic).

If someone refers to a shed load of something (biscuits, crack(!), whatever), I think it relates to the amount (an exageration of volume - enough to fill a shed).

Am I still missing the point? :? :)

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I'm still standing by it being a polite version of shitload that just so happens to make sense as well thanks to a shed having space for a load of stuff.
Shitload is the impolite version of a shed load.

I''m absolutely in the "a shed-load of biscuits" meaning a lot of biscuits, say for example the amount a lorry might lose if it crashed and not "a shed-load of biscuits" as in the amount you might fit into a shed.
Is the correct answer.

The origin is pretty obvious to me "wow, that's a shed load of biscuits" would be the comment as you drove past it, hence "a shed load" would then be adopted to mean a lot.

No chance, a shed load of biscuits would be sold as seconds :mrgreen:

A shed load isn't quantifiably large or small so in the "shed load of beer" context it can't possibly come from the lorry derivation, it comes from the garden shed derivation

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I've just seen the poll. How can I vote for both as 'shed load' can mean both? Context is the key!

The question is whether you think a shed load relates to the amount lost by a lorry or the amount you can fit in a shed. The literal meaning of a shed load is a given.

If a traffic report annouces a 'shed load' I think it relates to a load that has fell off the lorry (large or small - it's holding up traffic).

If someone refers to a shed load of something (biscuits, crack(!), whatever), I think it relates to the amount (an exageration of volume - enough to fill a shed).

Am I still missing the point? :? :)

A little. You're vote for an amount that might fit in a shed is so strong you're not seeing the other side of the fence.

I believe that when a traffic report annouces a 'shed load' I think it relates to a load that has fell off the lorry (large or small - it's holding up traffic).

I also believe that when someone refers to a shed load of something (biscuits, crack(!), whatever), I think it relates to the amount (an exageration of volume - like the amount that might fall off a lorry that's shed it's load.

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I'm still standing by it being a polite version of shitload that just so happens to make sense as well thanks to a shed having space for a load of stuff.
Shitload is the impolite version of a shed load.

I''m absolutely in the "a shed-load of biscuits" meaning a lot of biscuits, say for example the amount a lorry might lose if it crashed and not "a shed-load of biscuits" as in the amount you might fit into a shed.
Is the correct answer.

The origin is pretty obvious to me "wow, that's a shed load of biscuits" would be the comment as you drove past it, hence "a shed load" would then be adopted to mean a lot.

No chance, a shed load of biscuits would be sold as seconds :mrgreen:

A shed load isn't quantifiably large or small so in the "shed load of beer" context it can't possibly come from the lorry derivation, it comes from the garden shed derivation

And how bigs a garden shed? About as big as this piece of string?

Neither a shed load from a lorry, or a garden shed, has any specific sizing, so that argument doesn't really hold water.

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