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leviramsey

Possibly interesting maps...

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Credit to the Strange Maps blog.

Basically each state was renamed to the country with the closest total GDP.

Also amusing is the Stockholm Metro map with stops translated into English:

stockholmmetro.jpg

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They've missed off The People's Republic Of Usenet.

Usenet is near the IRC Isles, a shadowy area of the sea (since each newsgroup would probably be viewed as its own island on the map. There be dragons, trolls, and flamefests.

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They've missed off The People's Republic Of Usenet.

Usenet is near the IRC Isles, a shadowy area of the sea (since each newsgroup would probably be viewed as its own island on the map. There be dragons, trolls, and flamefests.

Oh, so it is. Skitt's Law invoked?

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I don't see where the grammatical flame that is required for an invocation of Skitt's Law is. The grammatical error "there be" is parodic of the whole "here be dragons" meme.

If you're generalizing Skitt's Law into something akin to something about those who live in glass houses, I'm not slamming Usenet (indeed, the trolls and flamefests are Usenet's greatest social feature relative to web-based fora such as VT.

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england2410_468x8161.jpg

It turns out the divide is more between the Northwest and the Southeast: on this map, the line (which, incidentally, does cross the Watford Gap – somewhere in between Coventry and Leicester) runs from the estuary of the Severn (near the Welsh-English border) to the mouth of the Humber. Which means that a town like Worcester is firmly in the North, although it’s much farther south than the ‘southern’ town of Lincoln.

At least, that’s the result of a Sheffield University study, which ‘divided’ Britain according to statistics about education standards, life expectancy, death rates, unemployment levels, house prices and voting patterns. The result splits the Midlands in two. “The idea of the Midlands region adds more confusion than light,” the study says.

The line divides Britain according to health and wealth, separating upland from lowland Britain, Tory from Labour Britain, and indicates a £100.000 house price gap – and a year’s worth of difference in life expectancy (in case you’re wondering: those in the North live a year less than those in the South).

The line does not take into account ‘pockets of wealth’ in the North (such as the Vale of York) or ‘pockets of poverty’ in the South, especially in London.

Clicky

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I tihnk I am pretty much dead on that line...

Me too mate. i live about as close to solihull as you can be without leaving brum, so the very south east of brum, and it's very close to that line.

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^ Levi, FYI, that map came out of the Spitting Image annual from about 1989. I haven't seen it for years! Good on who ever posted it online!

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350816052_0a392a0d28_o1.jpg

Ok umm. I'm not sure that makes any sense, closest to the GDP? Switzerland must have a HIGH gdp and yet Georgia* is named Switzerland? Also, Venezuela is matched up with Iowa...that doesn't seem right either.

Cool idea though.

*edited, oops mixed up AL with GA.

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Ok umm. I'm not sure that makes any sense, closest to the GDP? Switzerland must have a HIGH gdp and yet Georgia* is named Switzerland? Also, Venezuela is matched up with Iowa...that doesn't seem right either.

It's not based on per-capita GDP, it's based on nominal (read: total) GDP. It's not a metric of how rich/productive the state is, more a measure of how much overall the states contribute to the world's economy.

Switzerland's 2006 GDP was US$377,240 million (per the IMF) while the state of Georgia's is US$379,550 million (per the US Bureau of Economic Analysis). If the US splintered into 51 independent countries (including the District of Columbia), then 14 of the 40 largest economies would be former US states (there are some readily visible discrepancies between this list and the map; I suspect that the maker of the map was using figures from other sources and/or other years):

1. Japan

2. Germany

3. People's Republic of China

4. United Kingdom

5. France

6. Italy

7. California

8. Canada

9. Spain

10. Brazil

11. Texas

12. New York

13. Russia

14. South Korea

15. India

16. Mexico

17. Australia

18. Florida

19. Netherlands

20. Illinois

21. Pennsylvania

22. Ohio

23. New Jersey

24. Belgium

25. Turkey

26. Sweden

27. Michigan

28. Georgia

29. Switzerland

30. North Carolina

31. Virginia

32. Indonesia

33. Taiwan

34. Saudi Arabia

35. Poland

36. Massachusetts

37. Norway

38. Austria

39. Greece

40. Washington

does anybody have GDP breakdowns for England, Scotland, Wales, and NI? I'd suspect that England would probably come in between Italy and France, while Scotland would be down around 50 or so...

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