Jump to content

Any Carpenters/Interior engineers types onboard?


b23avfc
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I'm setting up this expedit unit.. it's pretty much full now. The genius worker hung it instead of letting it sit on the floor like I asked him. I originally asked if he could hang it but then bought another row to go above and told him to just let it sit on the floor.

 

Now of course it's starting to sink a little. Just a few mm showing in the top middle where it joins.. He saw this and added another support below, one in the centre to go with the two to the sides. Yet it's sinking again now. I'm thinking to give it some support, ply block 6.5" to fit the gap at the bottom, so it can sit nicely. Axle stands seem too tall to start with and car jacks too temporary.

 

So anybody have any idea about these things? Perhaps it's settled now and is safe. I mean there's no give at all. It is firmly attached to the wall and seems happy, other than the mm sink...

 

1mojREm.jpg?1

Top middle

 

xhNQKH7.jpg?1

The lot (inc temp measure)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it drilled into a solid brick/block wall or stud and plasterboard? If it brick id suggest taking it down and using longer bolts, if its plasterboard it shouldn't be attached to the wall at all.

 

Thanks for replying! It´s a solid wall. Good suggestion, I´m trying to avoid taken it all down but if needs must. Maybe it´ll settle?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you don't want to take it down id suggest taking most of the books and records off there so its light enough to push it back onto the wall and then slide a support underneath it and then put your things back on there, or just take it down and leave it on the floor, id say the problem is purely down to the length and strength of the bolts used to drill it to the wall though

(Construction worker for 11 years btw)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you don't want to take it down id suggest taking most of the books and records off there so its light enough to push it back onto the wall and then slide a support underneath it and then put your things back on there, or just take it down and leave it on the floor, id say the problem is purely down to the length and strength of the bolts used to drill it to the wall though

(Construction worker for 11 years btw)

 

That's great! If I went for the latter option, what support would you recommend, I currently have random stuff (weights and books). Maybe some wood cut to size? It's about 6.5" between floor and the current support so axle stands or jacks (aka my hair brained ideas from earlier today) wouldn't fit even if they'd work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But just to put your mind at rest, if it was going to fall off the wall it would have by now, it should be fine if you leave it as it is

 

You don't know how much that actually helps mate!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you don't want to take it down id suggest taking most of the books and records off there so its light enough to push it back onto the wall and then slide a support underneath it and then put your things back on there, or just take it down and leave it on the floor, id say the problem is purely down to the length and strength of the bolts used to drill it to the wall though

(Construction worker for 11 years btw)

That's great! If I went for the latter option, what support would you recommend, I currently have random stuff (weights and books). Maybe some wood cut to size? It's about 6.5" between floor and the current support so axle stands or jacks (aka my hair brained ideas from earlier today) wouldn't fit even if they'd work.

If you can make it light enough to be able to take the sag out of it and lift it back into place, once your happy its right a peices of wood at either end and one in the middle will keep it in place

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

If you don't want to take it down id suggest taking most of the books and records off there so its light enough to push it back onto the wall and then slide a support underneath it and then put your things back on there, or just take it down and leave it on the floor, id say the problem is purely down to the length and strength of the bolts used to drill it to the wall though

(Construction worker for 11 years btw)

That's great! If I went for the latter option, what support would you recommend, I currently have random stuff (weights and books). Maybe some wood cut to size? It's about 6.5" between floor and the current support so axle stands or jacks (aka my hair brained ideas from earlier today) wouldn't fit even if they'd work.

If you can make it light enough to be able to take the sag out of it and lift it back into place, once your happy its right a peices of wood at either end and one in the middle will keep it in place

 

 

The chap did that before, it's in place. But I think he didn't use a great piece for the centre to be honest, that's why I think the slight sag has returned in the centre.
Edited by b23avfc
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Page 19 of your fitting instruction booklet says do not wall hang.

The wall fixings supplied with it were to stop it tipping over and crushing your kids and pets.

 

 

fwiw that's an awful lot of weight pressing down on Ikea particle board. On the presumtion the fixings to the wall are only to the thicker outer framing, there is little support to the thinner shelves where all the weight is. Buying a couple of extendable cupboard legs from the Ikea kitchen department will give you some designer looking piece of mind that it isn't going to collapse. But I can't help thinking that unless you fix a small discreet bracket to the underside of every loaded shelf then you will, over time, see a bit of sag.

Instructions also say not to load shelves with more than 13 kilo's, but it's not clear if that's a whole shelf, or a pigeon hole.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Page 19 of your fitting instruction booklet says do not wall hang.

The wall fixings supplied with it were to stop it tipping over and crushing your kids and pets.

 

 

fwiw that's an awful lot of weight pressing down on Ikea particle board. On the presumtion the fixings to the wall are only to the thicker outer framing, there is little support to the thinner shelves where all the weight is. Buying a couple of extendable cupboard legs from the Ikea kitchen department will give you some designer looking piece of mind that it isn't going to collapse. But I can't help thinking that unless you fix a small discreet bracket to the underside of every loaded shelf then you will, over time, see a bit of sag.

Instructions also say not to load shelves with more than 13 kilo's, but it's not clear if that's a whole shelf, or a pigeon hole.

 

True. I believe he used extra fixings. He seemed happy. When it sagged a tad he had me empty it (grr) and added a support below. I'll check out those legs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd advise you to chuck out the Jeremy Clarkson books.

Dear Lord.

 

One would surely conceal that sort of thing if posting a picture on a forum. No wonder it's sagging/buckling.

 

I think I'd give up the ghost if I were a mounted wall unit and someone stored Clarkson books inside me ....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • VT Supporter

 

But just to put your mind at rest, if it was going to fall off the wall it would have by now, it should be fine if you leave it as it is

I don't think I'd sit with my back to it.

 

 

That's what she said.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

It really isnt very safe like that on them chocks of wood.

 

It is bracketed to the wall in several places too.

 

 

Those chocks arnt spreading the load like that tho and are doing the opposite.I really cant see how any default brackets can hold that much weight and i bet there only plugged and screwed when rly you need them resin bolted.

 

Id suggest taking it down and sitting it on the floor personally.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

exclamation-mark-man-user-icon-with-png-and-vector-format-227727.png

Ad Blocker Detected

This site is paid for by ad revenue, please disable your ad blocking software for the site.

Â