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what happens to that licence when you die?

Didnt read the full article but wasn't there a headline that Bruce Willis is challenging Apple through the courts for the right to pass on his i-tunes music collection to his kids when he dies ? Currently they are non transferable or something ?

He moaned about it a bit, then the Sun claimed he was going to sue Apple, he said it was bullshit though.

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You own a legit copy of say a vinyl album / cd / cassette / dat / whatever, you should be able to have it in whatever format you like. You register your ownership to obtain the licence until the day you die. After you die only the physical media you own can be inherited. It's as good as being implemented anyway as Tony points out even the majors are doing it in the video market. The Indies have been doing it with vinyl for some time, the majors are more reluctant but eventually in the not too distant future everything will come with a download code. The sooner the majors realise this is their way of gaining control again (which they've utterly lost) the sooner it will happen. I reckon it'll be industry wide in about five years. ATM they are doing it without the licence aspect, it is a logical conclusion of what is already happening.

Doesn't that just give an incentive to labels to use products with ever shorter life though? Vinyl might be hard to look after, but if you do, it will almost certainly last longer than CDs.

Following this logic, we'l start to see formats designed to last only six years (when the Limitations Act means you can no longer meaningfully complain). CDs/DVDs can easily be made using a degradable layer with a fair degree of control of when it will expire. In a few generations, people might need a whole room in their house to store the jewel cases of CDs they've inherited, which stopped being playable many years before, but have to be retained to prove ownership.

It's a hard problem, but it needs a solution.

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Going to see Alabama 3 in a short while.

Their current tour they are actively advertising and encouraging people to bring along whatever device they fancy, rip, record, film and generally steal their stuff. Mess with it. Use it to create something else. Then do them the courtesy of sending it back to them to see what people did with it.

They've worked out that at their scale, the music sales and steals are just a device for promoting the perpetual tour and spin off direct sales from their website and gig night goodies table.

The Grateful Dead encouraged their fans to make bootlegs right from the start, for the same reasons.
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Doesn't that just give an incentive to labels to use products with ever shorter life though? Vinyl might be hard to look after, but if you do, it will almost certainly last longer than CDs

If you're putting it in a time capsule, yes. If you're listening to it on a fairly regular basis then no.

Vinyl, like magnetic tape, loses a little something every time it's played.

A CD should last for a hundred years. CDRs are much more volatile though.

Following this logic, we'l start to see formats designed to last only six years (when the Limitations Act means you can no longer meaningfully complain). CDs/DVDs can easily be made using a degradable layer with a fair degree of control of when it will expire.

Can't see it catching on. Don't think many would buy a degrading CD/DVD/Blu Ray. Also media storage with no moving parts dominates the portable market already, home Hi Fi is going the same way.

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^^^ Just keep things in the cloud so to speak and it lasts forever. The idea is to remove the physical element completely I would have thought.

I can't remember the last time I used physical storage media (USB / CD / DVD/ ) and I am struggling to think of a reason why one would these days ? There must be reasons for some people though.

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^^^ Just keep things in the cloud so to speak and it lasts forever. The idea is to remove the physical element completely I would have thought.

I can't remember the last time I used physical storage media (USB / CD / DVD/ ) and I am struggling to think of a reason why one would these days ? There must be reasons for some people though.

If you keep something in 'the cloud' it is still being physically stored. It is just physically stored by someone else.

Basically you are trusting someone else to be better at storing your data than you are.

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...and I am struggling to think of a reason why one would these days ? There must be reasons for some people though.

My CD player is designed for one task, my computer is designed to do lots of things.

The CD player should sound better, and it does.

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I've got CDs - regular "pressed" CDs which don't play any more. CDs will not last 100s of years, the plastics will break down sooner than that.

The problem with keeping things in the cloud is proving ownership. If the company you are leasing your music from goes bust, what do you do? You may still have your own copies of stuff, but you can't prove you bought them legitimately. This was a problem with the Microsoft music licensing system (Plays4Sure). If the partner you'd bought your music from disappeared, you couldn't play your music any more. (It had other fundamental problems too.)

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...and I am struggling to think of a reason why one would these days ? There must be reasons for some people though.

My CD player is designed for one task, my computer is designed to do lots of things.

The CD player should sound better, and it does.

I don't get it, the CD spins and reads it, then passes it to speakers or whatever.

Digital reads it with no moving parts and does the same thing. Dunno, can you tell blindfold what is playing ? (If your life depended on it :-))

Just trying to understand this concept. Its Friday, bear with me :-)

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I have thousands of CDs, some getting on for 30 years old. I can count on one hand the CDs that have actually sonically degraded without surface damage. There were dodgy presses certainly, but less and less over the years.

In its case away from sunlight I hardly expect the plastic to degrade at all (look at the vast plastic garbage patches in the ocean). I would be most disappointed if most of my collection didn't make 100 years.

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I have thousands of CDs, some getting on for 30 years old. I can count on one hand the CDs that have actually sonically degraded without surface damage. There were dodgy presses certainly, but less and less over the years.
Same here.

What does annoy me is CDs that skip in some players, but not others. Luckily, my in-car player is not prone to it, which is good, as that's where I do most of my listening.

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In its case away from sunlight I hardly expect the plastic to degrade at all (look at the vast plastic garbage patches in the ocean). I would be most disappointed if most of my collection didn't make 100 years.

It's not the plastic that is the issue. The plastic doesn't contain the data, if it gets worn out you can buff the bottom of it off and the CD is new again. The important part is the label stuck onto the plastic. That's where the data is stored and if that gets scratched or degraded there is nothing you can do to repair it.

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The important part is the label stuck onto the plastic. That's where the data is stored and if that gets scratched or degraded there is nothing you can do to repair it.
Eh??? :shock:
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...and I am struggling to think of a reason why one would these days ? There must be reasons for some people though.

My CD player is designed for one task, my computer is designed to do lots of things.

The CD player should sound better, and it does.

I don't get it, the CD spins and reads it, then passes it to speakers or whatever.

Digital reads it with no moving parts and does the same thing. Dunno, can you tell blindfold what is playing ? (If your life depended on it :-))

Just trying to understand this concept. Its Friday, bear with me :-)

Digital-Analog Converters

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The major studios are working something called Ultraviolet which means when you buy a DVD or Blu-ray you get a digital copy which is stored in the cloud for you.

I dread to think how much money I have spent on VHS Tapes, I dont even own a video recorder these days and I certainly havent got a copy of them in a form I can play now.

I wonder if Sony thinks the money well spent that was used to win the HD-DVD / Blu-ray war because it definitely looks like legal streaming / downloads are the way forward.

How many of the youth today go to a store and buy a CD, it all downloaded from Itunes or Amazon.

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I still buy CD's. I much prefer a physical copy to digital. The act of buying a CD is also good fun.

I do notice less teens around than, say, 6-7 years ago, when I was one of many who crowded the aisles debating whether or not buying a Sex Pistols CD was worth it (it wasn't) or seeing who was brave enough to do the infamous 'lucky dip' and buy a random album on a whim.

You don't get that with iTunes or whatever.

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How many of the youth today go to a store and buy a CD, it all downloaded from Itunes or Amazon.

Not many towns have stores that sell tunes beyond the supermarket selection any more. :(

Saying that, there is a trophy element involved still.

The K-Pop scene sells a lot of boutique presentation 'mini albums' for £20+ and the kids don't bat an eye.

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