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The outrage, in my perception, was that NotW hacked Milly Dowler's phone

looking back to page 1 of the thread it seems to be the voicemail deletion that prompted this thread ..rather than the listening to the messages , as I said I'm fairly sure the listening was old news by this point

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The outrage, in my perception, was that NotW hacked Milly Dowler's phone

looking back to page 1 of the thread it seems to be the voicemail deletion that prompted this thread ..rather than the listening to the messages , as I said I'm fairly sure the listening was old news by this point

Looking back at the opening post, I'd suggest you'd just been responsible for some tabloid journalism ;-)

Being as it was I that started said topic and I think it was merely the hacking that started me off :mrgreen:

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Being as it was I that started said topic and I think it was merely the hacking that started me off Mr. Green

Meh ... :winkold:

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The fact remains that they hacked a dead girl's phone and the fees paid to the hacker were signed off by a senior member of the newspaper.

NI have only themselves to blame. It was clear that once Gordon Taylor was discovered to have been hacked, the practice was more widespread than one rogue reporter (after all, why would a royal correspondent be interested in the affairs of the head of the PFA?)

An internal investigation and a frank admission could have spared most of the fallout.

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A sad moment today. They were taking evidence from Julian Pike, and the first question was "Could you tell me your full name please, Mr Pike?". And no-one called out "Don't tell him, Pike!"

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I saw nuffink, Guv.

James Murdoch has told a parliamentary committee that he did not read a critical email sent to him in June 2008 by the editor of the News of the World, which indicated that phone hacking at the Sunday tabloid went beyond the activities of a single "rogue reporter".

Colin Myler forwarded Murdoch a note from the tabloid's legal manager Tom Crone, warning of a "further nightmare scenario," because there was fresh evidence of hacking involving a News of the World journalist other than the jailed former royal editor Clive Goodman.

However, although Murdoch replied to the email from Myler within three minutes of it being sent on 7 June 2008, offering to discuss the situation further, he added that "I am confident that I did not review the full email chain at the time or afterwards".

At issue at the time was a phone-hacking case brought by Gordon Taylor, the chief executive of the Professional Footballers' Association. Taylor's lawyers had obtained a transcript of voicemails taken from the phone of Joanne Armstrong, a lawyer at the PFA, which were taken down by reporter Ross Hindley and intended for Neville Thurlbeck, the newspaper's chief reporter – evidence that became known as the "for Neville" email.

Three days after Myler sent the note that Murdoch did not review in full, the News Corp boss met the editor and Crone on 10 June 2008 to agree to pay Taylor £700,000 to settle the case in secret. Murdoch's News Corp, however, continued to maintain that that hacking was confined to a single "rogue reporter" until the very end of 2010.

Accounts of that 10 June meeting have been disputed for months, with Murdoch repeatedly telling parliament that he did not see the "for Neville" email, nor did he understand its significance. Meanwhile, Myler and Crone have repeatedly contradicted Murdoch, saying the email was the sole reason for settling the case with what was the highest ever out-of-court payout for breach of privacy.

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Murdoch's position is astonishing. He gets an e-mail requesting a meeting/conversation; one of the four sentences in that very short e-mail is "Unfortunately it is as bad as we feared". He then meets his staff and agrees the payout, in order to keep the issue secret. But he maintains he didn't read the correspondence, didn't understand the significance of the issue, and had no idea that there was something to be covered up; ie the entire basis for making the payment.

He really must think the whole world is as gullible as some of his readers.

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In all fairness to Murdoch he's known for a while he's going to come out of this either as an alleged evil twunt that was possibly just incompetent, or as a proven evil twunt.

He's looked at the options and is trying for alleged evil twunt that was possibly just incompetent.

It's what lots of people would do.

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Piers Moron speaking today. Started off very cocky, then becomes a bit different as the questions proceed. Much less cocky, blinking a lot, tapping finger, licking lips. Lots of "I really can't remember...I had no reason to believe it was going on...I have no recollection..."

Earlier, hackette Sharon Marshall, ex-Sun, ex-NoW. Evasive, not answering question, changing subject - the very picture of an unreliable witness.

What a sorry pair.

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What a sad day, to see the proud journalists of our country's most upstanding organ arrested, dragged from their beds, and bailed like common criminals.

I speak of course of the Sun, whose integrity and rectitude has become a byword for all that is good about journalism for these last 40 years.

Their political editor, Trevor Kavanagh, explains their dilemma:

Kavanagh also took aim at the Metropolitan police, saying that Sun journalists were being "needlessly dragged from their beds in dawn raids" with "up to 20 officers at a time" ripping up floor boards – tactics that he described as treating "journalists like members of an organised crime gang". Kavanagh also said that some of the police had been diverted from other jobs, such as protecting the Olympics from a "mass suicide attack".

Referring to a recent court case in which the company admitted that senior executives and directors had lied to police and destroyed evidence, (Tom Watson MP) wrote: " It is News International's behaviour that is to blame for police having to devote immense time and resources to establish the facts. By deliberately lying to the police and trashing evidence they have made the job far more complex and expensive than it should have been."

Five senior Sun journalists were arrested on Saturday on suspicion of corruption under the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906, aiding and abetting misconduct in a public office (contrary to common law) and conspiracy in relation to both these offences. They were deputy editor Geoff Webster; the picture editor, John Edwards; the chief reporter, John Kay; the news editor, John Sturgis; and Nick Parker, chief foreign correspondent. There is no "public interest" defence as regards the 1906 act, and a payment of any size could trigger an offence.

Imagine Sun reporters dragged from their beds for dawn raids!

I thought that only happened when they had paid the police to let them attend newsworthy events like the raid on Redknapp's house.

How outrageous that it could happen to them in their capacity as suspected criminals.

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Never trust someone who earns more than you do. Especially if he earns 1000 times the money you do.

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how the hell can they get away with that? the same paper under a different name?

absolutely ridiclous. i promise everyone i will never spend a penny on buying that, i hope everyone else follows suit

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The answer is to designate News International, any company in their group or with shared directors, the entire Murdoch family, and anyone who has ever shared a meal or a taxi with them, not a "fit and proper person" for the purposes of ownership of media.

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Good old NI. Here's (N)Akers of the Yard describing a culture of entrenched and systemic corruption at the Sun, known about by senior management and deliberately concealed.

Close down all their outlets, and put them behind bars, starting with Ol' Rupe.

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They sold more copies of The Sun on sunday than they used to sell of the NOTW.

Well there's a surprise.

And once again, "the public wants what the public gets".

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