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Things you often Wonder


mjmooney
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1 hour ago, chrisp65 said:

Being basically broke for many many years meant I had to learn how to do basic electrics and plumbing.

Same. Our first house needed loads of work, and we were skint, so I taught myself the basics (electrics, plumbing, carpentry) from a DIY manual - this was long before the internet. Having said that, I never did as neat a job as a pro would, and nowadays I will get in a tradesman for the bigger jobs. It's true though, that YouTube and WikiHow are a great help. 

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I did loads of work in our first house, fitted the kitchen, wallpapering and decoration, some plumbing, woodwork here and there.  Most of it badly.  I swore in our new house I wouldn't do anything that needed a proper skill. I'd rather pay someone to make it look right than do it myself and it look crap.

I am pretty handy with a screwdriver though.

happy kenneth williams GIF

I'll change sockets and switches, install new light fittings, move some wiring about, changed the under cabinet lights.  But I wouldn't do anything that messed with the actual system like adding a spur or something.  You really need to know what you are doing.  

I did move the garage light switch from the actual garage door end to the house door end by putting in a junction box at the old terminal and running a new wire to the new location.  That's about as much as I would do.

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15 minutes ago, mjmooney said:

Same. Our first house needed loads of work, and we were skint, so I taught myself the basics (electrics, plumbing, carpentry) from a DIY manual - this was long before the internet. Having said that, I never did as neat a job as a pro would, and nowadays I will get in a tradesman for the bigger jobs. It's true though, that YouTube and WikiHow are a great help. 

My parents bought me the Readers Digest DIY manual.  I got SO many tips from that it's untrue.

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While I am swinging my dick. A couple of weeks ago I changed a plug socket the previous owners wired incorrectly. I wired correctly. Turns out they wired it incorrectly intentionally and thats how I came to call out an electrician on a sunday morning. 

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8 minutes ago, Seat68 said:

While I am swinging my dick. A couple of weeks ago I changed a plug socket the previous owners wired incorrectly. I wired correctly. Turns out they wired it incorrectly intentionally and thats how I came to call out an electrician on a sunday morning. 

Say What Weird Al GIF

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19 minutes ago, sidcow said:

Say What Weird Al GIF

Basically they installed a socket themselves that went against the standard rules and as such a double socket didn’t work. I wired it correctly and turns out the **** idiots wired it incorrectly correctly. It was not part of the main house, it was to a shed and so easy enough to sort out. 

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1 hour ago, mjmooney said:

Garages tighten up wheelnuts with those air pressure powered drivers. It's pretty well impossible for the average person to loosen them manually. I've literally jumped up and down on my wheel wrench, to no avail. 

There are two solutions to this

1) tell the garage to hand tighten your  nuts

2) buy a telescopic wheel brace - £8 from Screwfix

7182R_P&$prodImageMedium$

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3 hours ago, sidcow said:

My parents bought me the Readers Digest DIY manual.  I got SO many tips from that it's untrue.

Yep, that's the one. 

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3 hours ago, bickster said:

There are two solutions to this

1) tell the garage to hand tighten your  nuts

2) buy a telescopic wheel brace - £8 from Screwfix

7182R_P&$prodImageMedium$

Or 3) Buy your own air pressure driver thing. I did. Wasn’t that much. Best money I ever spent. 

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10 hours ago, bickster said:

You people that have no clue how to change a plug. What do you do if you buy a new light fitting for the ceiling?

Well I don't own a house for one thing. It's not up to me to buy light fittings.

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7 hours ago, HanoiVillan said:

Well I don't own a house for one thing. It's not up to me to buy light fittings.

Neither do I, I buy new lights and fit them. In fact I bought a new light for the back room downstairs only this Sunday, it required removing the rose and directly wiring to the ceiling. Not owning the house had no bearing on this

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35 minutes ago, bickster said:

Neither do I, I buy new lights and fit them. In fact I bought a new light for the back room downstairs only this Sunday, it required removing the rose and directly wiring to the ceiling. Not owning the house had no bearing on this

I've never had a rental contract that didn't specify making no changes to fixtures and fittings. Obviously they may exist, but I haven’t had one. 

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My DIY skills were such , that I remember ringing my mate once cause I’d changed a ligtbulb and was proud of myself .

 

but over the last few years I have got better , wouldn’t take on anything major but I can do general handyman stuff around the house 

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Posted (edited)

Plumbing is FAR easier nowadays with the invention of push fit connectors.

I’ll do basic plumbing, change plugs, light fittings, basic woodwork like skirting boards, I’ve hung a few doors.

Having a 3 year old house I’ve not needed to do anything for a while. Only decorating and changing a few light fittings.

Edited by Genie
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16 hours ago, bickster said:

There are two solutions to this

1) tell the garage to hand tighten your  nuts

2) buy a telescopic wheel brace - £8 from Screwfix

7182R_P&$prodImageMedium$

there's a (IMO) better and cheaper way. When I had a VW Camper the wheel nuts were absolute barstewards to undo. Happily there was a building site opposite the house, so I retrieved a piece of scaffolding about 3 foot long. A bit studier that necessary, but slotting that over the spider wheel brace meant I could get my nuts off easily.

spider.jpg  

The benefit being that the leverage is at right angles and a lot less likely to slip off or round the corners of the nuts. Obviously you don't need scaffolding, but a short length of steel tubing that will slide over the end of your tool is really useful and much cheaper.

This post is probably only of interest for geeks and prolific Kenny gif posters. 

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I always keep one of these in the boot, the shaft length doubles in size (huge kw) making it quite easy to loosen stubborn fixings.

21A9LjNbOtL._AC_UL600_SR600,600_.jpg
Can get them from Amazon for about £9, money very well spent.

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