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Extended Warranties / Guarantees


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Should i pay extra for the 5 year warranty?  

15 members have voted

  1. 1. Should i pay extra for the 5 year warranty?

    • YES
      3
    • NO
      12

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ive always bought from Richer Sounds and always get the 5 year warranty. Especially at just 10% of the price. Every tv ive had, ive had to get repaired under the warranty. Sometimes it was small issues that i would have otherwise put up with.

When they send off the tv they will also give you a loan set. Excellent customer service.

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I've successfully had several items replaced after three years. I've assisted many people in using the SOGA to get items repaired / replaced after the manufacturers' warranty has expired.

As you say in answer to the OP, almost certainly it is not worth buying and extended warranty.

Ok. so how do I go about this?

The story is, I bought a knife block from Argos in Nov '09.

During the summer last year we notcied one of the knives had rusted slightly and many of them we're becoming loose from the handle slightly.

But I couldnt find the Receipt. Argos said without it there was nothing they would do.

So 3 days ago I found the reciept. We still have the the whole set, albeit most are hardly used cause of rust or the loose blade.

Yesterday I emailed Argos explaining the situation who said all I could do was call into my local store and it would be down to the Managers discression.

So, if I go into the store, they say no sorry its out of date, as I'm sure they will, what do i do next?

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"out of date", doesn't really mean much. The question is whether is whether it's built to a standard which allows it to last a reasonable amount of time.

I'd start by asking them, loudly, in front of other customers, if they think that it's reasonable for the goods purchased to only last 15 months.

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I'd start by asking them, loudly, in front of other customers, if they think that it's reasonable for the goods purchased to only last 15 months.
This.

When we bought our first house I bought a flat-pack kitchen from MFI and fitted it myself. The mixer tap would not fit correctly to our water pipes, so I got a plumber out. He pointed out that the pipes on the tap were actually American gauge, slightly different from the British pipes, so they would never fit properly.

I took it back to the shop. They didn't want to give me a refund until I made it clear I was going to stand in the store and complain loudly until they did. They quickly gave in.

But that wasn't the end of it, as one of the base units also had two drawer fronts missing, which I requested there and then. They said they would order them and let me know when they arrived. My response was "No you won't. You'll go down to the warehouse right now, open up one of the boxes, give me the drawer fronts, and THEN you can order some replacements for the box you've just opened".

I could see that they hated me, but with a crowd of onlookers they had little choice, and they did it.

As John Cleese said, if you want anything done in this country, you've got to complain till you're blue in the face.

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thanks guy, i won't take out the extended guarantee.

a mistake. Most of the people seem to have answered a general question about taking out warranties. Your talking about an extra £50 on a £500 item with relatively new technology.

Plasma TV is not "relatively new technology", if it was it wouldn't cost £500

Extended warranties are a rip off, as Limpid points out, the one year, 3 year guarantee's aren't worth the paper they are written on literally, your consumer rights are better than those guarantees.

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The Sale and Supply of Goods and Services Act gives you a 6 year warranty from the retailer. Unless this extended warranty is free or offers extras like a replacement while yours is repaired, then no.

Does it cover electronics?

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  • 11 years later...

Thread resurrection!

I have a question about repairs, specifically, how long should repairs last? If it breaks again within a week, then they should fix it again without quibble. How about two years? Six months?

I had a repair done on a laptop. The repair failed after 5 months. They say I have to pay again. I say no, but what does the law say? I'm going round in circle looking, so any pointers from you people would be welcome

I have no idea what their 'guarantee' says, and frankly I don't care.

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It's not an answer but here goes.  

If it's in dispute, a court would decide if the repair lasted a reasonable time.   That is not defined.   It's based upon what the repair was, how much it cost and how you used the item.   

For instance, a £2000 repair to my car's suspension should last more than a week.  But not if I spent that week undertaking the World Rally Championship.    

The law cannot define every circumstance - so it doesn't.   

That's why you pay people like me to give an opinion on what's reasonable in your specific circumstance after only hearing your side of the story.  

That's why I have a mortgage free, four bed detached house in the suburbs.  😏

But only a court can give a decision after hearing both sides of the story.  

Edited by Mandy Lifeboats
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5 hours ago, Anthony said:

Thread resurrection!

I have a question about repairs, specifically, how long should repairs last? If it breaks again within a week, then they should fix it again without quibble. How about two years? Six months?

I had a repair done on a laptop. The repair failed after 5 months. They say I have to pay again. I say no, but what does the law say? I'm going round in circle looking, so any pointers from you people would be welcome

I have no idea what their 'guarantee' says, and frankly I don't care.

https://archive.org/download/DownTheLineBBCRadio4/Down The Line - 304 - The Elderly%2C Consumer Rights and The Countryside.mp3

https://fourble.co.uk/podcast/downline

Worth a listen to all of it but 12.30 mins onwards covers your questions 

Down the Line is a British radio comedy broadcast on BBC Radio 4, which satirises popular radio phone-in shows. The show, hosted by "Gary Bellamy" (Rhys Thomas), is semi-improvised and is written and performed in a style of heightened realism.
 

Edited by Follyfoot
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On 16/01/2023 at 14:26, Mandy Lifeboats said:

It's not an answer but here goes.  

If it's in dispute, a court would decide if the repair lasted a reasonable time.   That is not defined.   It's based upon what the repair was, how much it cost and how you used the item.   

For instance, a £2000 repair to my car's suspension should last more than a week.  But not if I spent that week undertaking the World Rally Championship.    

The law cannot define every circumstance - so it doesn't.   

That's why you pay people like me to give an opinion on what's reasonable in your specific circumstance after only hearing your side of the story.  

That's why I have a mortgage free, four bed detached house in the suburbs.  😏

But only a court can give a decision after hearing both sides of the story.  

A house in the suburbs eh? Can't win 'em all I guess.

Seriously though, I can't find the law on repairs anywhere, other than 'reasonable', which, as you very well know is a really good word for lawyers who want to generate money.

A Dell laptop, repaired by Dell and only used in an office environment. Surely it's reasonable to expect it to last at least a year? FWIW they replaced the battery, motherboard and charging socket, as the laptop wasn't charging. Now it's not charging again.

Please note, I'm not expecting you to give me lots of your time and expertise for free, but any links or recommendations for further reading would be very much appreciated.

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On 16/01/2023 at 18:02, Follyfoot said:

https://archive.org/download/DownTheLineBBCRadio4/Down The Line - 304 - The Elderly%2C Consumer Rights and The Countryside.mp3

https://fourble.co.uk/podcast/downline

Worth a listen to all of it but 12.30 mins onwards covers your questions 

Down the Line is a British radio comedy broadcast on BBC Radio 4, which satirises popular radio phone-in shows. The show, hosted by "Gary Bellamy" (Rhys Thomas), is semi-improvised and is written and performed in a style of heightened realism.
 

Most amusing. Not at all useful, but amusing nonetheless.

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41 minutes ago, Anthony said:

A house in the suburbs eh? Can't win 'em all I guess.

Seriously though, I can't find the law on repairs anywhere, other than 'reasonable', which, as you very well know is a really good word for lawyers who want to generate money.

A Dell laptop, repaired by Dell and only used in an office environment. Surely it's reasonable to expect it to last at least a year? FWIW they replaced the battery, motherboard and charging socket, as the laptop wasn't charging. Now it's not charging again.

Please note, I'm not expecting you to give me lots of your time and expertise for free, but any links or recommendations for further reading would be very much appreciated.

I'm a lawyer and have worked in-house for retailers for 13 years. This section of the Consumer Rights Act 2015 should help you:

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2015/15/section/24/enacted

What it essentially says is that a consumer has a final right to reject faulty goods purchased more than 6 months ago (where there was an inherent fault), the retailer/ manufacturer has already repaired or replaced the item, and the fault persists. You would be entitled to a refund, less a deduction to recognise the use you've had of the item before the fault became apparent. 

I would ask them to replace it (as the repair has not rectified the fault), failing which you exercise your final right to reject under s.24 Consumer Rights Act 2015 and require a proportionate refund of the price paid. 

This article provides a decent summary:

https://www.ouryclark.com/resource-library/quick-guides/commercial/consumer-rights-act.html

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