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There are some folks that certainly shouldn't smoke cannabis, there are some folks that shouldn't drink booze, ... neck Valium, ... snort cocaine, ...take paracetamol, ... eat peanuts etc etc

 

There's no hard and fast rule unfortunately, everyone's different. It's a lesser of two evils situation.

 

Though on the surface the Dutch model would seem to function better, and it's a revenue stream lost to the crims.

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The best post I've read. Nail. Head. That's a bingo.

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There are some folks that certainly shouldn't smoke cannabis, there are some folks that shouldn't drink booze, ... neck Valium, ... snort cocaine, ...take paracetamol, ... eat peanuts etc etc

 

There's no hard and fast rule unfortunately, everyone's different. It's a lesser of two evils situation.

 

Though on the surface the Dutch model would seem to function better, and it's a revenue stream lost to the crims.

.

The best post I've read. Nail. Head. That's a bingo.

 

 

Yeah. And another couple of things:

 

Making it illegal, as Xann says, provides revenue to criminals who trade in violence and threats of violence in order to operate. They are insulated from, and therefore have no interest in the need to provide a safe, uncontaminated product. Considering the popularity of the product in question, it's pretty disgraceful that so many governments prefer to simply persecute users.

 

Another major consequence of the simplistic approach is that it gives the police effective power over people who are guilty of nothing more than a weakness for something that is, at worst, mildly self-destructive. Frankly I've never met a police officer worthy of having the power to ruin my, or anyone else's life on that basis.

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There are some folks that certainly shouldn't smoke cannabis, there are some folks that shouldn't drink booze, ... neck Valium, ... snort cocaine, ...take paracetamol, ... eat peanuts etc etc

 

There's no hard and fast rule unfortunately, everyone's different. It's a lesser of two evils situation.

 

Though on the surface the Dutch model would seem to function better, and it's a revenue stream lost to the crims.

.

The best post I've read. Nail. Head. That's a bingo.

 

 

 

Making it illegal, as Xann says, provides revenue to criminals who trade in violence and threats of violence in order to operate. They are insulated from, and therefore have no interest in the need to provide a safe, uncontaminated product. Considering the popularity of the product in question, it's pretty disgraceful that so many governments prefer to simply persecute users.

 

Devil's advocate here - if users are persecuted, people would be discouraged from buying illegal drugs. Hence demand for the products would drop, jeopardising the business of the criminals who deal in them.

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Devil's advocate here - if users are persecuted, people would be discouraged from buying illegal drugs. Hence demand for the products would drop, jeopardising the business of the criminals who deal in them.

 

 

That's presumably the thinking behind the policies in most of the West, and in Singapore. It's a fantasy.

 

You're persecuting people for liking some mildly harmful, unusual cigarettes. And to discourage them properly you need to be able to hang them, like in Singapore, otherwise they fail to be discouraged, like in the US, UK, Australia, Europe, etc. Is hanging people for having a puff a worthwhile price to pay? Maybe it depends on your point of view, but I'd guess that most people would agree that it isn't.

Edited by CrackpotForeigner
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That is what happens when you privatise jails - you get competition to lock people up.

 

**** that.

 

It has less to do with moral objections to drug taking and more to do with turning a profit.

 

And, let's not kid ourselves, a brief stint in jail does more to ruin someone's life than a spliff now and then. Which is the greater evil? Doesn't take much to figure that out.

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Watch this film if you can

 

 

I linked this on iplayer in the film thread but it's now unavailable.

 

Powerful and depressing. I think the stat was 25% of the world's prisoners are in America, which has 5% of the population. Can't see it changing as the politicians are terrified of looking soft.

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Watch this film if you can

 

 

I linked this on iplayer in the film thread but it's now unavailable.

 

Powerful and depressing. I think the stat was 25% of the world's prisoners are in America, which has 5% of the population. Can't see it changing as the politicians are terrified of looking soft.

 

 

I read somewhere we have a higher incarceration rate than even America.

 

I'm not sure how true that is, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was.

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The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world.  It's about five times higher than ours is per capita.

 

A cynic might point out that the US have basically legalised slavery with the way their prison system works.   The manufacturing output of their prison population is huge, the average wage is about 25c an hour.  I'm a supporter of capitalism, but not to that extreme.  

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The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world.  It's about five times higher than ours is per capita.

 

A cynic might point out that the US have basically legalised slavery with the way their prison system works.   The manufacturing output of their prison population is huge, the average wage is about 25c an hour.  I'm a supporter of capitalism, but not to that extreme.  

 

Privatised prisons.

 

Utter insanity.

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The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world.  It's about five times higher than ours is per capita.

 

A cynic might point out that the US have basically legalised slavery with the way their prison system works.   The manufacturing output of their prison population is huge, the average wage is about 25c an hour.  I'm a supporter of capitalism, but not to that extreme.  

 

Privitised prisons. Can't believe that this is still around in the developed world... it's something that belongs to stay in the medieval times.

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tbf, the benefit of the $0.25/hr labor goes to the state, even in the prisons that are operated by contractors.

Someone's got to make the license plates....

Angola (state owned, not that far today from the plantation it was before the war)

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  • 3 months later...

Uruguay look like they may be taking steps to legalise Canabis. I think it's a positive step for that country, they've obviously had a more grown up debate about it over there than we get here.

It's a complicated argument with no simple answers, no doubt, it's not exactly harmless, what hedonistic drug isn't? But it's not the huge danger to society it's made out to be either, nowhere near. I personally don't like the drug, it does absolutely nothing for me. But I know so many people who do use it on a daily basis that it seems like an absurd situation that its illegal.

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