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Bollitics: The General Election 2010 Exit Poll


bickster
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How Did You Vote in the General Election?  

194 members have voted

  1. 1. How Did You Vote in the General Election?

    • Conservative
      52
    • Labour
      39
    • Liberal Democrats
      76
    • Green
      4
    • UKIP
      4
    • BNP
      5
    • Jury Team
      0
    • SNP
      0
    • Plaid Cymru
      1
    • Spoilt Ballot
      1
    • Didn't bother
      13


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Look, its ok, you’re amongst friends. You can talk to us about it.

I've posted enough like a complete word removed in the last week to doubt that (or at least to be surprised if that were so). :oops:

I think we all have... now imagine if Villa had lost at the weekend, I think this forum would be in total meltdown ;)

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So, just to confirm, in a general election, we all vote and then later the parties decide who won?

Well, we all vote (or don't as is our prerogative) for a load of people to be our representatives. Thereafter it is up to them to decide what is the best; that's representative democracy for you.

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So, just to confirm, in a general election, we all vote and then later the parties decide who won?

Well, we all vote (or don't as is our prerogative) for a load of people to be our representatives. Thereafter it is up to them to decide what is the best; that's representative democracy for you.

Well put. It's a good job you're here.

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Is there any possibility that we could see Lab/Lib get to 318 seats then the Conservatives make alliances with the odds and sods to gain a majority regardless?

It'd be tough...

Tories offer referenda on Scottish, Welsh, and Northern Irish independence to get SNP, Plaid Cymru, SDLP, and Alliance on board makes 319. Then Lab/Lib has to court the DUP (I don't think the Tories can credibly take on the DUP if they offer Scotland a referendum (thus selling out Scottish unionists)); the referendum might just get Sinn Fein to stop abstaining for long enough to make it 324 and then it's just a matter of picking off a Lib Dem from a right-leaning constituency. If all goes according to plan, the UK becomes just England and the Tories have a decisive advantage in the Commons for a long time to come.

Iain Murray of National Review thinks this option has legs

SNP have definitely said they will not work with the Tories (and they would be the most likely of the nationalists), I assume the same is true of Plaid and the SDLP might as well sign their own death warrants if they did. They would however quite naturally fall into bed with Labour in the "Rainbow Coalition". Add that to the absolute certainty that the Conservatives as a part of their core principals couldn't be seen to be breaking up the Union and your scenario would never happen Levi. Iain Murray, (who he?) obviously likes making up fairy stories

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we all vote (or don't as is our prerogative) for a load of people to be our representatives. Thereafter it is up to them to decide what is the best; that's representative democracy for you.

Well we also vote for the representative of a political party, not just an indivdual - unless of course that individual is an Independent MP. It does seem to be a constitutional anomaly that the party with most seats and which received the largest share of the vote by a clear two million ballots isn't automatically entitled to try and form a Government, be that by coalition or as the largest minority.

Anyway, another angle on this lib/lab/loser coalition...

Scotland has a devolved Parliament, Wales has a devolved Assembly, England has no Parliament of it's own and is ruled from Westminster. In Scotland Labour got 41 out of the 59 seats and in Wales, 26 out of 40. In England the Tories got 297 seats, with Labour on 191, the Lib Dems on 43 and the Greens 1 - a clear overall majority for the Tories of 59. Yet England is now likely to be ruled by a coalition which has drawn a significant amount of it's seats in Westminster from the devolved nations.

The Nationalists in said nations are required for the rainbow coalition to have any chance of working and even John Reid has admitted that:

England would bear the brunt of public sector cuts under any Labour coalition deal because it would be dependent on support from nationalist MPs from Scotland and Wales. Mr Reid said that would “further enrage” English voters.

I think Reid is right and it seems that in terms of democratic representation and *cough* fairness, the English population are going to seriously get the shitty end of the stick in all this.

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You know this clear two million more votes, it sounds a lot when you say it that way but if I said it was less than 5% of the electorate would you be surprised?

And are you really advocating breaking up the Union Jon? You do know that the devolved governments have very little real power, they just make local spending decisions really and on the majority of issues the whole of the country is governed by Westminster

England was always going to bear the brunt because *drumroll*………its much bigger than England, Wales and Northern Ireland

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England was always going to bear the brunt because *drumroll*………its much bigger than England, Wales and Northern Ireland

that *drumroll* must have been done by one of the Score brothers...

England is bigger than England, Wales and Northern Ireland?

I would be guessing that if the cuts are hardest in England because of the interests of PC & SNP holding up a Labour govt, is that they would likely to hit hardest to Labour supporters in England? That would be a very strange situation.

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I reckon proper reform now includes a presidential element to provide authority in an election - have the representative parliament through PR, AV whatever and have a seperate vote US style on a president. Would stop this stuff happening.

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You know this clear two million more votes, it sounds a lot when you say it that way but if I said it was less than 5% of the electorate would you be surprised?

It's approx 6.7% of votes cast (total of 29,653,638 and if you didn't vote then you deliberately sacrificed your voice) but if getting more votes than the other lot isn't seen as a benchmark then it seems to be a funny kind of democracy!

And are you really advocating breaking up the Union Jon? You do know that the devolved governments have very little real power, they just make local spending decisions really and on the majority of issues the whole of the country is governed by Westminster

England was always going to bear the brunt because *drumroll*………its much bigger than England, Wales and Northern Ireland

No of course I wouldn't be in favour of breaking up the Union, my points were:

1)If this rainbow coalition targeted England disproportionately for spending cuts (ie, to a greater extent than the rest of the UK per capita) then there is a very real risk of stirring anti-Unionist feeling amongst the English electorate, particularly if they see nationalists wringing concessions from the coalition to protect their own constituents.

2) England as a country is suffering from a substantial deomocratic deficit.

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Adam Boulton, Sky News's political editor, and Labour's former director of communications Alastair Campbell had a furious shouting match while being interviewed by the Sky News presenter Jeremy Thompson. Thompson started by asking Campbell whether Brown's decision was motivated by dignity or trying to seek party advantage, which the veteran spin doctor was able to parry by saying that "no party" had won the election.

The interview continued with Boulton taking over the questioning and the temperature rose for a good three minutes before events boiled over.

Campbell accused Boulton of having wanted Brown out of power for some time, prompting Boulton to question if Labour was acting in the national interest

Sky News said Boulton had "defended his integrity" and by implication that of the channel. Later in the evening Boulton also clashed with the culture secretary, Ben Bradshaw.

Campbell "Adam, you're obviously upset that David Cameron is not prime minister."

Boulton "I'm not upset …"

Campbell "You are, you probably are."

Thompson Laughs

Boulton [voice raised] "Don't keep casting aspersions on what I think. I am commenting ... don't keep saying what I think."

Campbell "This is live on television, dignity, dignity."

Boulton "Don't keep telling me what I think. This is what you do, you come on ... you say no one won the election. I'm fed up with you telling me what I think."

Campbell "I don't care what you're fed up with. I don't care what you're fed up with. You can say what you like, I can tell you my opinion."

Boulton "Don't tell me what I think."

Thompson "Alastair, you are being provocative and unnecessarily so ..."

Later Campbell says Brown is entitled to have remained PM while another government is formed, and has handled the situation properly. Boulton presses Campbell on why until today there had been no meeting of the cabinet or parliamentary Labour party. Campbell says that will now happen.

Boulton "In other words, it's you … totally unelected, have plotted this …"

Campbell "Me?'

Boulton "Yes."

Campbell "And you are elected are you?"

Boulton "No, but …"

Thompson "Gentlemen, gentlemen. "

Boulton "You are the one who has cooked this up with Peter Mandelson."

Campbell "Oh my God, unbelievable. Adam calm down, calm down."

[Camera pans away]

Boulton [out of vision] "I actually care about this country."

Campbell "You think I don't care."

Boulton [inaudible]

Campbell "Adam you are a pompous little arse."

Gosh what a pair.

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I think Reid is right and it seems that in terms of democratic representation and *cough* fairness, the English population are going to seriously get the shitty end of the stick in all this.

Need to correct you here Jon.

"English population", does that mean being a Jock living in England I won't get the shitty end of the stick? and those Taffs who commute across the Severn bridge to work in England wont.

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm

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I think Reid is right and it seems that in terms of democratic representation and *cough* fairness, the English population are going to seriously get the shitty end of the stick in all this.

Need to correct you here Jon.

"English population", does that mean being a Jock living in England I won't get the shitty end of the stick? and those Taffs who commute across the Severn bridge to work in England wont.

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm

Apologies, the population of England. Not trying to sound like Mr Griffin!

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RBD a few pages back Paul, with youtube links.

A classic moment. Boulton in meltdown .....

I know, but the transcript sums it up...

I honestly thought at one point there was going to be a bit of fisticuffs .... :P

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RBD a few pages back Paul, with youtube links.

A classic moment. Boulton in meltdown .....

I know, but the transcript sums it up...

I honestly thought at one point there was going to be a bit of fisticuffs .... :P

The photos suggest its not that far off. Definitely bad blood somewhere along the lines. Awful pair of hacks with devious motives. Much prefer the “right wing” BBC

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