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My kids school sports day there would be dads saying I hope their isn’t a dads race … and yet they just happened to be wearing trainers with their suits 

the kids schools never did parents races , which is as it should be

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6 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

Afaik Tottenham is a road and an area of London. What's the story behind the name Tottenham? Such a funny name I'm intrigued.

Without googling, ham will derive from hamlet, a kind of village here in britain. So my guess way back in a single digit century, toten had a hamlet. 

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38 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

Afaik Tottenham is a road and an area of London. What's the story behind the name Tottenham? Such a funny name I'm intrigued.

 

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1 hour ago, chrisp65 said:

 

London as it is now is far larger than it used to be. Up until about 200 years ago the area was considered to be outside London, it was basically the gateway to the north.

People would leave London and there would be a staging post or ‘pub’ where you could either get a meal as the coach changed horses, or grab food and drink for the journey. You could get a tot of spirits, and some gammon or ham. The public house quickly became known as the tot and ham.

It was owned by a short bearded fella that sold second rate writing materials, known as hamstrads.

More recently, the area was infamous for supporting Argentina’s claim to the Malvinas and was briefly referred to as tottingham, which is South American rhyming slang for super league shit hole you’re having a laugh.

 

It's hard for me to seperate the fact from the jokes here tbh. Are the first two paragraphs legit?

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1 hour ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

Afaik Tottenham is a road and an area of London. What's the story behind the name Tottenham? Such a funny name I'm intrigued.

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Tottenham is believed to have been named after Tota, a farmer, whose hamlet was mentioned in the Domesday Book. 'Tota's hamlet', it is thought, developed into 'Tottenham'. The settlement was recorded in the Domesday Book as Toteham, in the ancient hundred of Edmonton. It is not related to Tottenham Court Road in Central London, though the two names share a similar-sounding root.

Wiki

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Similarly Birmingham is believed to derive from Beormingaham - Beorma's people's home. Beorma is likely to have been an Anglo-Saxon tribe leader, or perhaps a legendary figure as opposed to a real person. Either way people that viewed themselves as tethered to him called the area home and over the years the name changed.

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Kinda curious as to why you think Tottenham is an unusual name, @KenjiOgiwara? Maybe it’s overfamiliarity on my part, but is it a stranger place name than say, Runnymede or Braintree?

I will say that it is kinda quirky the club have Henry Percy’s nickname as part of the club’s name. It was only relatively recently I learned the names were directly linked. I’m not sure what I thought before. 

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1 hour ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

It's hard for me to seperate the fact from the jokes here tbh. Are the first two paragraphs legit?

Sorry, yes all my answer was a joke, but loosely based on an actual truth. That in the last 200 years London has expanded to swallow towns and villages that for 2,000 years were considered to be outside London.

In the 1750’s people were worried that the relentless expansion of London would mean it would soon be pushing up against neighbouring places such as St Georges Fields (Hyde Park), Lambeth, and Clapham. Places we would now consider an integral part of inner London.

I have a fairly decent 800 page history of London. It doesn’t mention Tottenham once, which feels about right for how important the place is. Although saying that, the best Indian restaurant in London, The Agra, is just off Tottenham Court Road.

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16 minutes ago, Mark Albrighton said:

I will say that it is kinda quirky the club have Henry Percy’s nickname as part of the club’s name. It was only relatively recently I learned the names were directly linked. I’m not sure what I thought before. 

According to wiki

Quote

The name of one of England's football clubs, Tottenham Hotspur F.C., acknowledges Henry Percy, whose descendants owned land in the neighbourhood of the club's first ground in the Tottenham Marshes.

 

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8 hours ago, Mark Albrighton said:

Kinda curious as to why you think Tottenham is an unusual name, @KenjiOgiwara? Maybe it’s overfamiliarity on my part, but is it a stranger place name than say, Runnymede or Braintree?

I will say that it is kinda quirky the club have Henry Percy’s nickname as part of the club’s name. It was only relatively recently I learned the names were directly linked. I’m not sure what I thought before. 

I dunno tbh. It's something about totten and ham that just is funny to me. Don't you have some words like that? It's like the Norwegian word for fork, which is gaffel. I can genuinly spend minutes chewing on that word and never figure it out. I've done that my entire life. It's always that word that's funny to me too. 

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2 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

I dunno tbh. It's something about totten and ham that just is funny to me. Don't you have some words like that? It's like the Norwegian word for fork, which is gaffel. I can genuinly spend minutes chewing on that word and never figure it out. I've done that my entire life. It's always that word that's funny to me too. 

We don’t see ham as odd in place names here. Its very common. 

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11 hours ago, Seat68 said:

Without googling, ham will derive from hamlet, a kind of village here in britain. So my guess way back in a single digit century, toten had a hamlet. 

Sorry to bring one back up, but does that mean Toten is an area or county? 

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18 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

I dunno tbh. It's something about totten and ham that just is funny to me. Don't you have some words like that? It's like the Norwegian word for fork, which is gaffel. I can genuinly spend minutes chewing on that word and never figure it out. I've done that my entire life. It's always that word that's funny to me too. 

Not sure how many words are like totten.  It’s a bit like totem as in totem pole but that word doesn’t often come up in my day to day use anyway.

I suppose the way it’s pronounced is slightly strange. It’s not pronounced “Tot-ten-ham”, it’s generally more like “Tot-num”. Of course there’s the way Ossie Ardiles said “Totting-ham” which is the go to jokey way of saying it I think.

But again I think that’s true of a few places. I live down the road from a place called Tettenhall. In my life, I’ve met one solitary person who insisted on pronouncing it as “Tet-en-hall” (she was a bit of a Hyacinth Bucket figure). Everyone else says “Tet-nall”.

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3 minutes ago, Mark Albrighton said:

Not sure how many words are like totten.  It’s a bit like totem as in totem pole but that word doesn’t often come up in my day to day use anyway.

I suppose the way it’s pronounced is slightly strange. It’s not pronounced “Tot-ten-ham”, it’s generally more like “Tot-num”. Of course there’s the way Ossie Ardiles said “Totting-ham” which is the go to jokey way of saying it I think.

But again I think that’s true of a few places. I live down the road from a place called Tettenhall. In my life, I’ve met one solitary person who insisted on pronouncing it as “Tet-en-hall” (she was a bit of a Hyacinth Bucket figure). Everyone else says “Tet-nall”.

My satnav calls eccleshall, eccles hall. 

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6 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

Sorry to bring one back up, but does that mean Toten is an area or county? 

Assuming it was a person. We have a lot of places that are either named after a river, e.g Weymouth, basically a settlement on the mouth of the river wey. We name a lot of places like this. Chippenham, was named after an anglo saxon king, Cyppa’s ham. So Tottenham is named after a farmer called Tota, tota’s hamlet. 

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