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3 hours ago, A'Villan said:

Eh.

5:30am and I'm about to go for my first 10km run at 6am with my Ugandan friend who's helping me with my fitness for basketball.

I honestly don't think I'll make it through the 10km without stopping for air and rest, even if momentarily, but I guess we'll find out.

 

So how did you get on?

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2 hours ago, dubbs said:

So how did you get on?

Thanks for checking in. Did 3km at a pace I was surprised I could manage, I didn't want to embarrass myself in front of my friend though. Then we shot 300 shots each for basketball and called it a day.

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What's people's experience with doing park workouts mid run. Depending on my day I run 2-4 kilometers, then do all kinds of monkey bars stuff in the park, then run some more. 

I feel running after getting the muscles in the upper body going, is absolutely awful. I feel like I run like one of these steroid freaks that can't wipe their own arse. My arms really really hurt when running and it's just an awful experience. 

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48 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

What's people's experience with doing park workouts mid run. Depending on my day I run 2-4 kilometers, then do all kinds of monkey bars stuff in the park, then run some more. 

I feel running after getting the muscles in the upper body going, is absolutely awful. I feel like I run like one of these steroid freaks that can't wipe their own arse. My arms really really hurt when running and it's just an awful experience. 

I’ve been doing a couple of sprints in the gym at the end of my sessions, and you’re right. After working your upper body and arms, running becomes really awkward. Just goes to show how running also uses the whole body, and your arms are an important part of generating forward motion.  

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In running land, the recommendation is to do any lifting etc., after a run and to keep leg days for your hard run days if relevant. 

Try a triathlon brick, running feels completely alien after a moderate/hard cycle... I suspect quite similar to how one feels after an upper body session mid run.

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Coming into running as a bit of a nooby pleb, is it normal for your knees to ache after training? I'm running on paths etc because there aren't any usable parks near me. Wondering if it's impact related or just my body adjusting to exercise. 

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2 hours ago, dubbs said:

Coming into running as a bit of a nooby pleb, is it normal for your knees to ache after training? I'm running on paths etc because there aren't any usable parks near me. Wondering if it's impact related or just my body adjusting to exercise. 

If you've just started running, there's bound to be a few aches and pains from your body doing stuff it's not used to. If the aches last longer than a day or so, it could be the impact, especially if you've got a few pounds to shift. To be on the safe side, get yourself some trainers that absorb a lot of impact and see if they help.

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1 hour ago, Risso said:

If you've just started running, there's bound to be a few aches and pains from your body doing stuff it's not used to. If the aches last longer than a day or so, it could be the impact, especially if you've got a few pounds to shift. To be on the safe side, get yourself some trainers that absorb a lot of impact and see if they help.

I've brought some trainers which should absorb a decent amount of impact but I'm no expert!

A couple of ibruprofen seem to have helped my knees so fingers crossed its just a bit of my body adjusting to the exercise. 

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Just started getting into running, built myself up to do my first 5k on Saturday which was less of an ordeal than I imagined.

Did another 3k tonight on a regular route and earned myself a PB. I'm starting to see how this can get addictive.

Think I'll have to invest in some new running shoes if I can keep it up. Any suggestions?

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My bpm has always been weird, but after 6 months of inactivity it's bonkers.

My last run I ran pretty slowly but my bpm was 182-195 with 186 avg, for the entire run. Start to finish. It just sky rockets and stays there.

At the same time my resting heart rate is <50 at all times every day.

Guess I am just in really bad running condition atm.

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53 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

My bpm has always been weird, but after 6 months of inactivity it's bonkers.

My last run I ran pretty slowly but my bpm was 182-195 with 186 avg, for the entire run. Start to finish. It just sky rockets and stays there.

At the same time my resting heart rate is <50 at all times every day.

Guess I am just in really bad running condition atm.

Maybe it's the pace you're running at,  and how you are breathing as you run.  I managed to gain control of mine by counting to 4 as I breath in,  then 4 again as I exhale.   Not sure about your resting bpm though. 

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I started running last year during the first lockdown. Nothing too crazy but 30 - 45 mins a few times a week, then one day I decided I could run much further and went off down the river and ended up pulling my hamstring. I had to walk the three miles back in pain, and that kind of put me off ever since. I’m going to get back into it this year, but recognise the fact I’m 41 soon and try not to get injured.
 

Any tips for warming up that might help reduce the chance of muscle pulls? I usually just do some squats and lunge stretches, but I’m not sure how effective that is.

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Stretches are good but I also do a brisk 5 min walk before and after.  The stretches certainly help with reducing tightness after exercise in my opinion anyway. 

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2 hours ago, It's Your Round said:

I started running last year during the first lockdown. Nothing too crazy but 30 - 45 mins a few times a week, then one day I decided I could run much further and went off down the river and ended up pulling my hamstring. I had to walk the three miles back in pain, and that kind of put me off ever since. I’m going to get back into it this year, but recognise the fact I’m 41 soon and try not to get injured.
 

Any tips for warming up that might help reduce the chance of muscle pulls? I usually just do some squats and lunge stretches, but I’m not sure how effective that is.

I usually do 5 minutes of dynamic stretching and loosening up, then before my run another 5 minutes walk / jog before going into the run itself. You can google all different types of dynamic stretching.

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17 hours ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

My bpm has always been weird, but after 6 months of inactivity it's bonkers.

My last run I ran pretty slowly but my bpm was 182-195 with 186 avg, for the entire run. Start to finish. It just sky rockets and stays there.

At the same time my resting heart rate is <50 at all times every day.

Guess I am just in really bad running condition atm.

That sounds like a poorly calibrated reading, i.e., you really got trapped around 160 and it is simply off by a constant amount. Most runners I know, those kind of heart rates are 5k pace leaving it all out there kind of things.

You might have a weird upper limit, even with your average (tip top shape) regular reading.

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I've always spiked high. On rowing workouts the last 5 years I tend to hit the roof between 196-218, but normally it builds up slowly and I only hit high bpm when I really go hard.

With running now I hit relatively high bpm without even trying. It's just weird. I can also physically feel I get very tired.

Maybe it's equipment issues and bad covid fitness. My work is sending me for O2 readings soon, so I'll find out then I guess.

I've never been a good cardio athlete unfortunately.

Clocked another 7 km today with about 3 km uphill. Well chuffed with being at it again.

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3 hours ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

I've always spiked high. On rowing workouts the last 5 years I tend to hit the roof between 196-218, but normally it builds up slowly and I only hit high bpm when I really go hard.

With running now I hit relatively high bpm without even trying. It's just weird. I can also physically feel I get very tired.

Maybe it's equipment issues and bad covid fitness. My work is sending me for O2 readings soon, so I'll find out then I guess.

I've never been a good cardio athlete unfortunately.

Clocked another 7 km today with about 3 km uphill. Well chuffed with being at it again.

218 would put you way up in the top 1% of high HR reading. I'd like a second opinion on any of that data. O2 testing should be fun... I hope it's a surprise beep test, muhahahahaha.

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Into week 3 of the couch to 5k programme.  Enjoying it but not sure if my knees will last the course.  They're OK after a run but the following morning they are so stiff. 

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