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If you had the money would you educate your kids privately?


paddy
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Would you put your kids into private education if you had the money?  

70 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you put your kids into private education if you had the money?

    • Yes
      40
    • No
      31
    • I already do
      0


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I want my kids to have a good all round education but I think I will find it hard to find a public school that has the sports facilities private schools have and I think it's very important part of an educaiton.

Teaches you to be part of a team more than any other lessons.

Agree Grammar schools are very important for the public system. Every child needs an equal opportunity....to a certain degree.

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the key is money isn't it ?

how much does it cost far too much for me even if I wanted to and a few assisted places does not make up for the fact only a small % of the population can afford it

said it before if a Kid is intelligent and willig to lear they will make it anywhere the support of the parents is the vital parents

as for sports I bet you the vast vast vast majority of sportmen and women went to state schoold certainy for footballers that is true

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I see several contributors to this thrad have used the term "public school" in the American sense, rather than the traditional English (public = private) one.

Yes, it has become quite confuddling.

I blame the education system for that. Had they gone to a public school they would know the difference.

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a few assisted places

What assisted places?

The scheme was binned in '97 (so by my reckoning the last potential recipient of the scheme would have left school in 2003).

as for sports I bet you the vast vast vast majority of sportmen and women went to state schoold certainy for footballers that is true

And there you are talking about the upper echelons of the sporting world whereas the major benefit of sport for people in general is their involvement in it.

I don't think anyone is celebrating Independent schools as the bedrock of the sporting elite but that they, perhaps, dedicate proportionally more of their time and funds to extra-curricular activities (especially sport) than the state sector.

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a few assisted places

What assisted places?

The scheme was binned in '97 (so by my reckoning the last potential recipient of the scheme would have left school in 2003).

as for sports I bet you the vast vast vast majority of sportmen and women went to state schoold certainy for footballers that is true

And there you are talking about the upper echelons of the sporting world whereas the major benefit of sport for people in general is their involvement in it.

I don't think anyone is celebrating Independent schools as the bedrock of the sporting elite but that they, perhaps, dedicate proportionally more of their time and funds to extra-curricular activities (especially sport) than the state sector.

far more people surely play sports at state level and ok public may have more resources per school but most sports get the majority from the state secotr, athletics is another

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far more people surely play sports at state level and ok public may have more resources per school but most sports get the majority from the state secotr, athletics is another

Considering that the vast majority of people are educated through the state sector then I would think that it would be amazing if 'far more people' didn't play sports in the state sector.

Therefore any comparison cannot be done on the basis of the overall quantity but on some relative comparison.

As for your last bit - what people are discussing is sod all to do with the numbers who become elite sportsmen (or women) but rather the numbers who take part or the opportunities that there are for people to take part.

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I went to private for years 7-11 and then public for 12&13 - my opinion on private education is that the teaching isnt better, but the facilities are. The kids also are handpicked (exams and such) so are the ones who want to learn, not mess about.

The sporting facilities at the school I went to were exceptional, and were a massive, massive bonus to me and helped me achieve higher standards in my sports than I believe I would have if I'd gone to the school I did for my A-Levels all the way through.

Sure, there are differences in the attitudes of the kids at both schools, but (as above) 'life skills' are more learnt at a much younger age than this - and there wasnt a lot that I missed out on, and advantages I gained from going there still continue today.

I'm grateful to my parents for that (although because of Rugby I actually didnt really pay anything financially) and always will be - if I had the cash I'd allow the same opportunity to my child, but if they didnt want that - I certainly wouldnt impose or even rail-road them into it.

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far more people surely play sports at state level and ok public may have more resources per school but most sports get the majority from the state secotr, athletics is another

Considering that the vast majority of people are educated through the state sector then I would think that it would be amazing if 'far more people' didn't play sports in the state sector.

Therefore any comparison cannot be done on the basis of the overall quantity but on some relative comparison.

As for your last bit - what people are discussing is sod all to do with the numbers who become elite sportsmen (or women) but rather the numbers who take part or the opportunities that there are for people to take part.

I think there are larger and on-the-whole, better, opportunities for sport from private schools, maybe because I was bording, but I always had chances to use top class equipment anytime I chose.

The fields that we played on were better standard than professional (well, I compare to Ninian Park and a couple of others) and we had top quality coaching as well as equipment.

I dont think there can be any further argument a sportsperson will develop more under those circumstances than what state-funded schools offer.

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Yeah most footballers are from State schools as football is working class sport...

Hmmm, percentage wise, I'd be amazed if that were true.

These schools place a huge emphasis on their sporting prowess against the other schools. I (and a few others) got in for solely sporting reasons. We had a boy who played professionally for Oxford United while he was in year 11 playing with us - I was a schoolboy international while in years 10 & 11 and only got into the schools first 11 mid way through year 10.

I've played against quite a few players who went to pro - and we only played against other private schools - say if 1% of kids go to private schools (dont know the facts, just using for arguments sake) - then you'd expect 1% of pro footballers to have that background, I'd probably wager its a bit higher.

Certainly in Rugby and Cricket, it'll be an awful lot higher.

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