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Pay Rises (& inflation)


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So with inflation soaring, what sort of pay rise have you had recently or will you get this year?

Will it keep up with inflation?

Will you ask for more or will you get a pay-rise automatically?

What will you do if you get none or minimal pay-rise?

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1 hour ago, chrisp65 said:

I’m going to heed the advice of the Bank of England and try to keep my wages low so as to help the economy.

 

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I got almost a 10% pay rise in December, I'm fortunate to be in baking where Brexit has caused a skills shortage and I was in a position to hand in my notice 3 weeks before Christmas to force their hand.  I suspect it'll be the last pay rise I get before I try it this December.

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2.75%, but I'll still be worse off with energy prices, nursery increases, fuel increases, etc.

I'm underpaid (comparatively) to others in my profession as well, so will be approaching that subject after I complete my next project ("look what I do blah blah"), if that doesn't work, I'll be looking for elsewhere.

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9 hours ago, chrisp65 said:

I’m going to heed the advice of the Bank of England and try to keep my wages low so as to help the economy.

 

Doesn’t Boris want a high wage economy? I’m surprised the BoE boss went against the PM. 

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1 hour ago, Genie said:

Doesn’t Boris want a high wage economy? I’m surprised the BoE boss went against the PM. 

Pay rises lead to inflation, and BoE's one job is to keep inflation at 2%, so it makes sense. Still an idiotic thing to say

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5 minutes ago, Mozzavfc said:

Pay rises lead to inflation, and BoE's one job is to keep inflation at 2%, so it makes sense. Still an idiotic thing to say

It was more a dig at Boris’s equally idiotic comment. All headline and no substance.

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4 hours ago, Ingram85 said:

NHS worker. I’ll leave it at that. 

Have you thought about redeployment? Loads of Covid response stuff about at the moment, I went on secondment from my substantive band 6 last March and have somehow wound up in a band 8a. Absolutely the quickest way to move up at the mo, and as WFH is pretty much here to stay, office bases don't really matter anymore so you could look at jobs all over the map.

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6 minutes ago, GarethRDR said:

Have you thought about redeployment? Loads of Covid response stuff about at the moment, I went on secondment from my substantive band 6 last March and have somehow wound up in a band 8a. Absolutely the quickest way to move up at the mo, and as WFH is pretty much here to stay, office bases don't really matter anymore so you could look at jobs all over the map.

Blimey dude, 8a is mega bucks isn’t it? I thoughts you were a dildo handed music biz person?

I’m a retard who won’t take risks in terms of going up the ladder, band 3/4 is my level in terms of responsibilities im willing to take on. I’m band 3 at the mo but I’m after band 4 Mon-Fri 9-5. I don’t want to work weekends anymore and the 13 hour shifts are starting to take its toll a bit. 

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7 hours ago, Ingram85 said:

Blimey dude, 8a is mega bucks isn’t it? I thoughts you were a dildo handed music biz person?

Dildo-handed, absolutely.

Essentially what happened with the last NHSE re-structure the year before the pandemic was that the main focus/goal was to get rid of a lot of the admin-type roles that traditionally fell under bands 4 and 5; VSMs (literally "Very Senior Managers", feckin' LOL) were using 4s and 5s within their respective teams as their own little PA squads, which they weren't meant to be doing, so the "thinking" (a term I use very lightly when it comes to NHSE strategic planning) was that the VSMs go back to doing their admin-level stuff (travel booking, expenses etc.) they should have been doing for themselves in the first place and hey-ho, we'll save a tonne of money by Thanos-snapping a load of the admin staff.  Now, here comes the kicker (and I very much speak from experience on this); turns out the VSMs were also routinely getting their 4s and 5s with sufficient nous/skills to do work well beyond their banding.  Also, just 'cause you're a VSM that can talk with authority on your particular field of expertise, don't mean you know diddly squat about how to navigate the absolute quagmire of systems and processes you need to actually get shit done around here (Kafkaesque doesn't begin to describe it); know who that knowledge tends to sit with?  Your admin staff.  So suddenly, we have a massive skills gap.  So now, you have to create a whole new raft of job specs to cover the competencies of everyone you just got rid of, except you've got to make those jobs sufficiently attractive and, as you'll attest, we're not historically known for offering attractive salaries.  So the end result of that is going back out to advert for what are essentially the old band 4 and 5 roles, except now they've been re-banded upwards to a 6 or even 7.  The work is largely the same, or at the very least doesn't require any more specialist know-how or aptitude then you'd already have.  6s and 7s traditionally were advertised as project management areas, but I swear most of NHSE doesn't really understand what project management is/should entail, so it invariably fell under the catch-all "admin staff" banner, so any 4s and 5s making the step up would be finding themselves doing stuff that by and large they already knew how to do.

Then you factor in the pandemic.  People are getting thrown left, right and center to plug gaps left in teams where people have left to join Covid response programmes.  Most folk are working remotely now, we've been told it's the new normal and I'm working with folk who aren't even in the country, so it's a completely open playing field in terms of jobs you can apply for.  And anyone with actual front-line experience who can speak to the patient experience, that's always an attractive prospect when recruiting to NHSE posts.

Bottom line; if you want to make the move out of front-line, now's the time to be looking.  I'd hardly call myself ambitious, either; I get into comfort zones very easily, and I wouldn't have even thought of applying for the job I have now myself, it was only because I was encouraged to that I did, and I certainly didn't think I'd be getting it.  4 years ago, I was getting made redundant from my hideously underpaid and unappreciated band 4 role.  To be where I am now is, quite frankly, bonkers to me.

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I wouldn’t trust CPI as an index either. It doesn’t include housing costs as the RPI does. If mortgage rates go up, the actual cost of living increase will be much worse. Employers and pension providers, with the encouragement of this government, now overwhelmingly use CPI. When inflation was low it only made a small difference, now, it’s going to be a serious issue.

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9 hours ago, GarethRDR said:

Dildo-handed, absolutely.

Essentially what happened with the last NHSE re-structure the year before the pandemic was that the main focus/goal was to get rid of a lot of the admin-type roles that traditionally fell under bands 4 and 5; VSMs (literally "Very Senior Managers", feckin' LOL) were using 4s and 5s within their respective teams as their own little PA squads, which they weren't meant to be doing, so the "thinking" (a term I use very lightly when it comes to NHSE strategic planning) was that the VSMs go back to doing their admin-level stuff (travel booking, expenses etc.) they should have been doing for themselves in the first place and hey-ho, we'll save a tonne of money by Thanos-snapping a load of the admin staff.  Now, here comes the kicker (and I very much speak from experience on this); turns out the VSMs were also routinely getting their 4s and 5s with sufficient nous/skills to do work well beyond their banding.  Also, just 'cause you're a VSM that can talk with authority on your particular field of expertise, don't mean you know diddly squat about how to navigate the absolute quagmire of systems and processes you need to actually get shit done around here (Kafkaesque doesn't begin to describe it); know who that knowledge tends to sit with?  Your admin staff.  So suddenly, we have a massive skills gap.  So now, you have to create a whole new raft of job specs to cover the competencies of everyone you just got rid of, except you've got to make those jobs sufficiently attractive and, as you'll attest, we're not historically known for offering attractive salaries.  So the end result of that is going back out to advert for what are essentially the old band 4 and 5 roles, except now they've been re-banded upwards to a 6 or even 7.  The work is largely the same, or at the very least doesn't require any more specialist know-how or aptitude then you'd already have.  6s and 7s traditionally were advertised as project management areas, but I swear most of NHSE doesn't really understand what project management is/should entail, so it invariably fell under the catch-all "admin staff" banner, so any 4s and 5s making the step up would be finding themselves doing stuff that by and large they already knew how to do.

Then you factor in the pandemic.  People are getting thrown left, right and center to plug gaps left in teams where people have left to join Covid response programmes.  Most folk are working remotely now, we've been told it's the new normal and I'm working with folk who aren't even in the country, so it's a completely open playing field in terms of jobs you can apply for.  And anyone with actual front-line experience who can speak to the patient experience, that's always an attractive prospect when recruiting to NHSE posts.

Bottom line; if you want to make the move out of front-line, now's the time to be looking.  I'd hardly call myself ambitious, either; I get into comfort zones very easily, and I wouldn't have even thought of applying for the job I have now myself, it was only because I was encouraged to that I did, and I certainly didn't think I'd be getting it.  4 years ago, I was getting made redundant from my hideously underpaid and unappreciated band 4 role.  To be where I am now is, quite frankly, bonkers to me.

I work remotely but never thought of this. I would assume as im in London ill hav eto stay in a london trust

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Inflation should have been tackled much earlier but governments and the always slow central banks were too slow to react. Interest rates need to increase quickly. In the short term this will piss everyone off, reduce living standards and make governments look bad but in the long term it will curb inflation.

Effectively its 2 years of pain however we've had it pretty good since the last bust in 2008. Very low inflation rates and an increase in living standards. Now it's time for payback for all the free money that was pumped into the global economy.

Central banks need to realise that inflation is a long term trend with a lag effect, it takes time to increase/decrease. Also their models to predict it are pretty much alway wrong and they'll be wrong again now. 

One point to note is that governments might just embrace a bit of inflation. It will help reduce debt, will increase wages and might even help post pandemic recovery. 5% inflation could be here to stay for a couple of years. 

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