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9/11...20 years later


Big Salad
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I was at sixth form, went home to watch it on the news and saw the 2nd plane hit as well as both collapse 

Was a crazy day, I would say my generations JFK / moon landing and its impossible to predict or guess what the next event of that magnitude will be

I've been to the memorial, personally I think the way they've done the water features in the footings are really nice and the museum is very sombre and well done 

Without wanting this to sound the wrong way, when I watch the docs and see things about it I do think that the number of people killed is surprisingly low but the damage that was done is incredible, its completely changed elements of the world for the worse, maybe that's just me getting older 

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Nice post and fair play to u for volunteering to work. I too remember exactly where I was at the time and how I first heard about it. My wife phoned me at work and told me a plane crashed into the WTC. My mental picture was a light aircraft had technical issues and the people on board had died and maybe some people on the streets below were very unfortunate. I went to our work restaurant to see it on TV and was just dumbstruck and what unfolded for the rest of the day. I spent the entire day glued to the TV. Luckily, I had no friends or family directly involved.

I have also visited NY many times and have visited the site on multiple times. Flying over NY, I always feel emotional at the gap in the skyline.

 

9 minutes ago, Big Salad said:

Saturday at the memorial event will be sad but also full of joy in the sense that we will never forget and hopefully the world will get better as a whole if we lay our problems/differences aside and try to make it so.

 

And this Sir, is the most important part of your comment 

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I was on a training course in Hull. Somebody got a text saying there had been some sort of terrorist attack at the WTC, maybe a bomb. When we had a coffee break I went out to the car and and phoned my wife, who was off work that day, as one of the kids was sick. She was watching TV and told me about the first plane going in. I was still trying to get my head around it, when I heard her say "Oh, **** ing hell..." - she had just seen the second plane hit, live on TV. As you say, the world changed. 

Edited by mjmooney
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I was just over two months in to my first job. It was about 2pm GMT I think? A colleague sent an e-mail to the staff, about two lines long. Short and to the point. Our computers didn’t have access to the internet so we were fairly reliant on information being reported through this method. The office had a minute (or two) silence a couple of days later.

Unsurprisingly I can’t offer anything profound or a unique thought. I will say it’s odd the things that stick with me, in this case it was the radio stations just going from song to song with no “banter” in between for the next couple of days. Just announcing what the last song was and what the next song will be, one after the other, until the next news bulletin. That, in it’s own small, insignificant way, was a little bit surreal.

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I was at secondary school, I'd just walked home and opened to door to find my nan watching the live news report. She just turned to me and said there had been a plane crash. Iirc we saw the footage of the second hit live. I also vividly remember going to school the next day and while we were all gathered around the site waiting for day to start a plane went over and there was that horrible over the top hysterical screaming thing teens do in reaction, which in hindsight only seems in increasingly bad taste.

It kinda focused my interests from that point. I wouldn't have done the degree I did had that event not happened. I wouldn't know a lot of the stuff that I now have etched into my brain.

I used to work for a company that had a plaque commemorating it by the door. I always felt quite poignant when my eyes caught sight of it when leaving.

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I was a daft 14 year old and it took me a while to grasp the magnitude of the whole thing. I can’t even remember hearing about the first tower being hit, but I assume it would have been my mom who told me when I came in from school.

I remember her coming upstairs to tell me about the second tower and her explaining that it meant it was a terrorist attack and I asked something like, “This is a big thing then isn’t it? It’s something I’m going to remember.”

I’ve been to the memorial in New York, but the museum hadn’t yet opened when I went. It’s not something I’m sure I could handle walking around if I’m being honest. I can’t watch the documentaries. I’ve heard a few of the answerphone messages left by the victims to their loved ones and they break me.

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I worked in Canary Wharf at the time (I worked in IT for an investment bank )

I’d been for a run , was getting a Starbucks and the tv sorta in the background that I wasn’t paying a huge amount of attention to  had a picture of the towers and saying a plane had hit it … went back to my desk thinking someone had flown a Cessna into it by accident. … then the second one hit and the full picture emerged … we all just stood there dumbfounded glued to the screens.

then the rumours started about planes heading to Canary Wharf and Parliament and the tannoy system told us all that if we wanted to we could evacuate / go home … I don’t think anyone did we just stayed glued to the TV’s … or the telephones as some of our colleagues were in New York at the time …. 

watching the various programs this week and when they show the firemen inside the lobby and you hear repeated crash / thumps as the jumpers hit the ground , it still shocks even now , those poor souls .

i still think it’s the biggest event in my lifetime , even with Covid and what not .

Edited by tonyh29
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I was in my kindergarten class on the day. My mom rushed to pick me up early as we lived in the DC area and didn't know if we were going to have another attack after the Pentagon.

I get to explain/teach the historical significance and impact this had on us since to my high school US history classes tomorrow. (all of whom were born several years after 9/11). Will be very somber. The videos I've picked out are pretty emotional as well

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8 hours ago, Big Salad said:

 It was a day that truly changed the world and if you ever get a chance to visit the 9/11 memorial in NYC I implore you to do so. It will be a sad experience but also humbling in the sense that we do not need to take life for granted and try to live every day to the fullest.

 

Never Forget - Wildfire Today

Amen to that comment. Wife and self were in NYC not all that long after this atrocity; at that time, there was no 'formal' Memorial but many hand written pictures and notes from the relatives of the victims. You would have to be 'hard' not to have been moved by it but as OP says it is worth a visit just to pay respects and hope it never happens again. IMO, the only thing that equates to it are the Military Cemeteries in Normandy - Arromanche for example.

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