Jump to content

The Gravy Feud® and Other Gastronomic Delights


Recommended Posts

  • Moderator
38 minutes ago, OutByEaster? said:

For me, the fish, chips and gravy combo is representative of a sort of moral failure in our society. It speaks of a set of values which I cannot get behind. 

I should say first that I love a bit of battered cod, and I love chips. I love chips and gravy, they're a delicious slippery treat, but I live in a carefully managed social construct, one that has rules and principles. It's quite loosely held together and that looseness is what allows us our creativity and freedoms, but it is held together, there's a fabric to society, agreed moral and intellectual premises on which we can create expectations for living 'normal' lives, ideas under which we can co-exist collectively and successfully.

I like a full breakfast. I also like a lasagne - but crucially I recognise that I can't have both of those things at the same time on the same plate - I mean I could, I could have all my favourite foods at the same time, all together, but for me at least it would be a betrayal of the social contract that says I'll play the game, I'll fit in, that I believe what you believe and will work with you to achieve it. I'm not against creativity, free thinking or change, far from it - if Blandy were proposing for example a spiced fish, or chips made out of a different vegetable, I'd give it a go, I might like it, I might not, but I think that's a fair bit of experimentation.

However, I believe that just piling all of your favourite things on one plate is a moral weakness. It's giving in to your inner child, the one that wants milkshake on his Frosties and it's abandoning the collective for a form of pure rugged individualism. It's the food culture of Reagan, the culture that says that what's important is you, you the individual and only you; it's get-ahead, it's do your own thing, it's screw the other guy and his normal meal, it's let desire dictate, let the market for what you want lead you to what you do, it's the food of Friedman, the rejection of the state, the death of socialism at the hands of the all powerful individual, the one that wants a pickled onion on the side.

It's not a movement I can abide.

It may for you appear a tenuous argument, but for me fish, chips, gravy and a pickled onion picks at the fringes of belonging, it pulls at the loose thread of society, it rejects the collective values of our forefathers, and what's more it does it with a food that has always acted a symbol for the working classes, a cultural archetype, binding us together, now under attack by the merciless desires of individualism.

It is the egg and jam sandwich of the oligarchy, rubbing its buttery mess in the face of the proletariat and it must be stopped!

Unless you're pissed obviously, when you're pissed and it's late you can throw whatever you like together.

This is the argument of a true Conservative, the sort used to venerate the Royal Family, Golf clubs and their "protocols". It's all very last night of the Proms, very stick in the mud. It's reminiscing around nostalgia for a non existent past, where Britannia ruled the Waves, and the colonies provided the Empire with all the tea in India, in exchange for the "civilising" fist of the Upper classes. We know best, obey our command little people. Your time has gone - get with the granules!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, OutByEaster? said:

You're an anarchist, and while I respect that, I suggest that you sit down, have a nice pint of Guinness and lemonade and consider your position.

You've used the words nice and Guinness in the same sentence there. 

giphy-downsized.gif

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sidcow said:

You've used the words nice and Guinness in the same sentence there. 

giphy-downsized.gif

 

Absolute muck. Black Castlemaine XXXX with an enormous marketing budget.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's something I've never had - one of these weird Guinness cocktails that Irish bars abroad offer, one in town here sells Guinness and cider, Guinness and beer, Guinness and smirnoff ice 

Guinness and black obviously, I've had Guinness and tia Maria too but who's drinking those things? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, bickster said:

Neither had I, until the pastie shop at New St Station started selling them. Very nice they are but they are about as Welsh as yorkshire pudding.

Any story that starts "Legend has it" is dubious from the outset. Any story published by Reach Media and specifically a title related to their Liverpool Office is about as trustworthy as a Michael Gove statement, given that they are notorious for getting facts wrong, not lies just plain simple facts, like the name of a type of cloud.

 

I'd guess that the Welsh connection goes back no further than Max Boyce. Most of my family is Welsh and I've never heard of them before the last few years.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Moderator
20 hours ago, Risso said:

I'd guess that the Welsh connection goes back no further than Max Boyce.

Not even that far, there's no connection between Oggy Oggy Oggy and pasties. It's just something Max completely made up

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderator
On 05/03/2021 at 19:54, villa4europe said:

That's something I've never had - one of these weird Guinness cocktails that Irish bars abroad offer, one in town here sells Guinness and cider, Guinness and beer, Guinness and smirnoff ice 

Guinness and black obviously, I've had Guinness and tia Maria too but who's drinking those things? 

Just shit, ennit, Guinness? Have a coffee or have a pint. Don't **** about trying to make some sort of one-size-fits-all flavour ****.

People who love it are people who wear t-shirts proclaiming they love it, and ain't nobody got time for those words removed.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • VT Supporter
8 hours ago, NurembergVillan said:

Just shit, ennit, Guinness? Have a coffee or have a pint. Don't **** about trying to make some sort of one-size-fits-all flavour ****.

People who love it are people who wear t-shirts proclaiming they love it, and ain't nobody got time for those words removed.

Was at a wedding and a northern bloke offered one of those half Guinness half cider (Black Velvet?) deals. I finished it, barely :wacko:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently* Guinness is such an aspirational brand that many people claim to drink it who actually don't.  When they conduct surveys about it, if as many people actually drank it as claim to do so their sales would be around triple what they actually are. 

I can't imagine pretending to like something so much that I would claim to drink it in a survey. 

* I realise this means it's probably bullshit. 

Edited by sidcow
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • VT Supporter
3 minutes ago, sidcow said:

Apparently* Guinness is such an aspirational brand that many people claim to drink it who actually don't.  When they conduct surveys about it, if as many people actually drank it as claim to do so their sales would be around triple what they actually are. 

I can't imagine pretending to like something so much that I would claim to drink it in a survey. 

* I realise this means it's probably bullshit. 

Drinking from the furry goblet

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Follyfoot said:

Drinking from the furry goblet

You volunteer for different surveys to me. 

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • VT Supporter

Guinness is still the best beer you can get in a lot of places, which says more about the quality of those places than the drink itself. I’m happy that it’s a better stock option than any commercial lager though.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't mind Guinness, went through a period in my 20s drinking it and then came off it cos of drinking in rounds at the football 

"what do you want?" 

"ill have a Guinness" 

"I got you a carling" 

I can't do sessions on it anymore though, have to stop at around 5, so the idea of sticking a smirnoff ice in it and going turbo shandy* would work for me... But **** that, don't even go Guinness and black, if you're sticking stuff in it then you shouldn't be drinking it 

* the idea of a turbo shandy was to get drunk quicker not to make the drink palatable 

Edited by villa4europe
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • VT Supporter

Guinness is great for a session though, despite the myth that it’s as heavy as a meal, the low carbonation makes it much drinkable than a fizzy lager.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Moderator
1 minute ago, fightoffyour said:

What if it was reduced down into a sauce?

You could make a Guinness batter. That might be good.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of use Terms of Use, Cookies We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Â