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19 minutes ago, Genie said:

Keeping a site open and staffed through the night, every night when there will be very little to do.

If there’s enough sites (which is sounds like there will be loads) then it won’t be necessary.

You wouldn’t keep sites open you’d use those that are open 24 hours in any case. 

Vaccine levels permitting, if you offered someone the chance to go at 4am to get it that otherwise isn’t likely to get it until August or September they wouldn’t be quiet in my view.

I’m not saying 24 is automatically necessary but given the urgency for getting this vaccine rolled out, dose numbers permitting, it not being at least under consideration is to me at best short sighted.

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8 minutes ago, TrentVilla said:

You wouldn’t keep sites open you’d use those that are open 24 hours in any case. 

Are there any vaccine places open 24/7 ? I don't think there are at the moment. There may be hospitals open 24/7 but surely the staff in there are doing work on sick people, which they'd have to stop doing to do vaccinations instead?

So unless there are sufficient trained staff available and willing to work night shifts (they're then not available for day shifts), what problem does it actually solve?

I get that in world where there were plenty of staff and facilities it would speed up the overall process, but I'm not at all sure that the NHS has the people and resourcing to do it.

Maybe in a few areas it might be practical, particularly if the number of cases and people needed treatment reduces, but right now it sounds like a nice idea in theory, but not so of an easy thing to actually do. Am I missing something?

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3 minutes ago, blandy said:

Are there any vaccine places open 24/7 ? I don't think there are at the moment. There may be hospitals open 24/7 but surely the staff in there are doing work on sick people, which they'd have to stop doing to do vaccinations instead?

So unless there are sufficient trained staff available and willing to work night shifts (they're then not available for day shifts), what problem does it actually solve?

I get that in world where there were plenty of staff and facilities it would speed up the overall process, but I'm not at all sure that the NHS has the people and resourcing to do it.

Maybe in a few areas it might be practical, particularly if the number of cases and people needed treatment reduces, but right now it sounds like a nice idea in theory, but not so of an easy thing to actually do. Am I missing something?

They are talking about making the vaccine super centres 24 hour operations. 

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33 minutes ago, TrentVilla said:

You wouldn’t keep sites open you’d use those that are open 24 hours in any case. 

Vaccine levels permitting, if you offered someone the chance to go at 4am to get it that otherwise isn’t likely to get it until August or September they wouldn’t be quiet in my view.

I’m not saying 24 is automatically necessary but given the urgency for getting this vaccine rolled out, dose numbers permitting, it not being at least under consideration is to me at best short sighted.

If we're accepting "vaccine levels permitting" as being fine, surely the only thing that restricts the speed is people to actually carry out the vaccinations?

Space / location isn't (I had a flu shot the other week through my car window in the carpark of a local non-league football club). 

So the people doing the jabbing with needles , if they are there at 3am, they're at home asleep at 3pm. So the hours they are open doesn't really matter - 50,000 people working 8am - 6pm or 25,000 doing that and another 25,000 doing the shift after doesn't end with more people vaccinated. 

Edit - by the time I'd finished typing blandy had said the same thing but better.

Edited by ml1dch
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11 minutes ago, sidcow said:

They are talking about making the vaccine super centres 24 hour operations. 

I know. I was responding to this "You wouldn’t keep sites open you’d use those that are open 24 hours in any case."

But there aren't currently any (afaik) so you'd be opening up ones specifically for the purpose, but where do you find the staff from - that's my question. I'm not saying @TrentVillai wrong, I'm saying I personally don't understand how it can currently work, and asking for someone to explain it.

 

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15 minutes ago, blandy said:

Are there any vaccine places open 24/7 ? I don't think there are at the moment. There may be hospitals open 24/7 but surely the staff in there are doing work on sick people, which they'd have to stop doing to do vaccinations instead?

So unless there are sufficient trained staff available and willing to work night shifts (they're then not available for day shifts), what problem does it actually solve?

I get that in world where there were plenty of staff and facilities it would speed up the overall process, but I'm not at all sure that the NHS has the people and resourcing to do it.

Maybe in a few areas it might be practical, particularly if the number of cases and people needed treatment reduces, but right now it sounds like a nice idea in theory, but not so of an easy thing to actually do. Am I missing something?

The feasibility or otherwise of it is though a different point to the one I responded to, neither of us can really state what is and isn’t practicable in terms of 24 hour delivery. I agree there would be many logistical questions but given that the vaccine is now being delivered in a small number of non NHS settings it should I think, vaccine stocks permitting, be part of the conversation and where possible part of the solution.

The point I was responding to was that the very suggestion of 24 hour delivery was “excessive” as if it were not necessary. As I think I originally mentioned both health wise and financially I don’t think the consideration of 24 hour delivery is in any way excessive.

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5 minutes ago, ml1dch said:

If we're accepting "vaccine levels permitting" as being fine, surely the only thing that restricts the speed is people to actually carry out the vaccinations?

Space / location isn't (I had a flu shot the other week through my car window in the carpark of a local non-league football club). 

So the people doing the jabbing with needles , if they are there at 3am, they're at home asleep at 3pm. So the hours they are open doesn't really matter - 50,000 people working 8am - 6pm or 25,000 doing that and another 25,000 doing the shift after doesn't end with more people vaccinated. 

Edit - by the time I'd finished typing blandy had said the same thing but better.

That’s working on the assumption the number of those delivery remains static, as I’ve mentioned in my previous post that doesn’t necessarily need to be the case.

Just to add, the Gov have actually approved a trial of 24 hour delivery to asses it’s potential for impact on delivery capacity.

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