Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
KentVillan

Addiction

Recommended Posts

On 07/09/2019 at 10:25, KentVillan said:

It's a very "alpha" drug. That's where a lot of its glamorous reputation comes from - because it's expensive and it appeals to needy egos, people who are very gluttonous in their approach to life, and like to have their ego stroked.

The public image of cocaine is very much what you see in the early stages, when it's still done in public, so you mainly see young, beautiful people doing it. The rock stars and models and actors and cityboys and so on.

I suspect the truth is that most of the money spent on cocaine is actually sad, middle-aged men flirting with heart disease, chewing someone's ear off in a bar, and then going home to have a wank or ordering in a prostitute (something I've never done actually, but I know the two are a popular meal deal).

To be honest, I'm cautious about sharing too many of the fun time stories, because they really are just tempting nostalgia for anyone who has ever done this stuff. (I remember watching Wolf of Wall St, which supposedly exposes the dark side of cocaine abuse, but really for any cocaine user it's just a massive advert for it. It's very similar to seeing an obese person enjoying a Big Mac. You don't think about the obesity, you just think about the delicious Big Mac.)

Anyway, for every amazing experience, there's 100s of dreary nights (and days) of moronic, narcissistic chat finished off with a neverending wank and heart palpitations, followed by several days of bleak living hell. Broken relationships and failed jobs. It's such a pointless existence.

And of course you're risking a heart attack or a stroke on top of the effects on your mental health.

By the way, if there's a slight tone in my posts of me blaming the drug or blaming politicians or blaming dealers, then that's not really how I feel about my own situation. I know that it's my responsibility, even if I have a genetic predisposition or whatever. Everyone has their weaknesses, and life is all about overcoming them.

Also I don't want this thread to be dominated by cocaine. I'm genuinely interested in other people's problems and how they've dealt with them.

I find that part of the problem with talking about addictions is that addicts tend to be raconteurs and tend to get nostalgic about the glory days, and there's always a little part in an addict's head that kind of enjoys the gallows humour of the dark days (shitting my pants while waiting to board a plane is my favourite). But what's really important is to be solution focussed. Whenever I focus on today, and tomorrow, and the week ahead I tend to find I'm more powerful. When I start storytelling it can give me that little rush of anticipation.

 

Whilst you're speaking a lot of truth here, I believe your message here is slightly cynical, maybe you would agree?

Most of the people I know who do coke, and I know quite a few, are really quite pleasant and even down to earth. Even when they overdo it and talk at me, rather than with.

I've done it less than a handful of times and I don't think I ever will again. The quality in Australia is useless and even when our crew had a good connection, it wasn't my thing.

Until drugs are legal I don't really see a culture that allows for them to be healthy developing, perhaps most would suggest I am an idiot for suggesting drugs could be healthy.

I think in our current state, as it is, consumerism is rife, things are taken for granted, as are people. Superficiality and keeping people at arm's length is the norm.

"Mind your business as they say"

When you have these underlying traits ingrained into society and as dogma, whether people recognise that it is that way or not, the tendency will be to take it with you in any walk.

Whether drugs, business, relationships etc.

It's all about respect, I think, and it's great that everyone deep down knows it, but unfortunately for whatever reason it is not so readily accomplished as a practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@KentVillan I'm about to start a long day, will get back to you when I can.

I glanced over the post, and as always it seems well reasoned and discerning.

I'm not by any means suggesting that drugs will somehow cease to have harmful consequences, should society change the attitude surrounding them.

As I mention it's about respect, and that means appreciating that consumption at a certain rate or frequency will have detrimental effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some absolutely top drawer posts in this thread.  Ruge and Kent, your posts have been as eloquent as they have honest.  Powerful stuff.

@villan-scott I totally get the FUT thing.  I think I still have some semblance of an addiction to it, even if only in terms of the time I spend on the web app to trade and build teams.  I managed to build an incredible squad this year without spending a cent.  In previous years though, especially in Canada where I was pre-kids, earning a fortune, and in a different timezone to my mates so had nothing better to do, I spent fortunes.  I was never one to buy packs, though.  I was fully cheating and buying coins.  A market crash and the loss of a load of in-game coins was soul-destroying.  Looking back it was pretty intense.

I like to think I don't have an addictive personality, but I think we're all vulnerable to something.  Just a case of whether we've stumbled upon it and how negative an impact it's had.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, NurembergVillan said:

Some absolutely top drawer posts in this thread.  Ruge and Kent, your posts have been as eloquent as they have honest.  Powerful stuff.

@villan-scott I totally get the FUT thing.  I think I still have some semblance of an addiction to it, even if only in terms of the time I spend on the web app to trade and build teams.  I managed to build an incredible squad this year without spending a cent.  In previous years though, especially in Canada where I was pre-kids, earning a fortune, and in a different timezone to my mates so had nothing better to do, I spent fortunes.  I was never one to buy packs, though.  I was fully cheating and buying coins.  A market crash and the loss of a load of in-game coins was soul-destroying.  Looking back it was pretty intense.

I like to think I don't have an addictive personality, but I think we're all vulnerable to something.  Just a case of whether we've stumbled upon it and how negative an impact it's had.

It’s a very easy trap to fall into it. I really got into the trading side of it this time around, which was still addictive, but not costing anything. Special mention to @ml1dch who got me started with the SBC and trading. Saved me a fortune!! 

EA are terrible though, every week there are offers on packs, and special packs to open, limited time etc etc. So easy to just think I’ll spend 10-20 quid and open a few, and get carried away. They have a lot to answer for. 

There has been talk on the news this week about capping in game purchases. I hope they do make some changes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea what FIFA ultimate team is but reading some posts on here the fact you can actually buy players with real money sounds very wrong .  Especially since it’s mainly kids playing FIFA. 

Edit: I just read up on what FUT is and now I’m tempted to buy it! 

Edited by Vive_La_Villa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Vive_La_Villa said:

Especially since it’s mainly kids playing FIFA. 

Yup, the big game studios have become a rather insidious gambling racket, hiding their exploitative practices in the costume of their older products. Hard to see what can be done short of actually banning it though.

You can ban it in games aimed at kids and enforce 18 ratings on any game that has gambling mechanics in it, but when does an 18 rating stop kids playing games? 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Davkaus said:

Yup, the big game studios have become a rather insidious gambling racket, hiding their exploitative practices in the costume of their older products. Hard to see what can be done short of actually banning it though.

You can ban it in games aimed at kids and enforce 18 ratings on any game that has gambling mechanics in it, but when does an 18 rating stop kids playing games? 

Even more emphasis on parents to know what their kids are doing I guess. 

When I was a kid my parents didn’t have a clue what I used to be up to. I used to play Lesuire Suit Larry when I was about 11 lol.

Edited by Vive_La_Villa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting piece on a treatment centre for gambling addiction https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-49687500

Quote

An estimated 340,000 people across the UK have a serious gambling addiction, according to the Gambling Commission.

The NHS and the charity Gamble Aware are jointly funding the service in the north of England - which is expected to cost about £1m a year - for the next three years.

The service is set to open centres in Manchester and Sunderland, to serve the north of England and north Midlands.

It's extraordinary that we've allowed this problem to reach that scale, given that gambling is something the state has a lot of power to control. I feel a bit ashamed to support a club and follow a sport that is complicit in fuelling this problem through advertising, sponsorship, etc. clearly targeted at children.

On a separate note, if anyone is quietly reading this thread and debating whether to share their own experiences, for what it's worth, I've found it really useful and a source of strength. More than once over the last week I've revisited some of the stuff I and others have written in this thread, and it has helped to focus my mind in the right direction.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, KentVillan said:

I feel a bit ashamed to support a club and follow a sport that is complicit in fuelling this problem through advertising, sponsorship, etc. clearly targeted at children.

Same, it all feels very grubby. the amount of money in this sport, and they feel the need to make just a tiny bit more by getting in to bed with these grubby companies. They're an absolute blight on society and it's horrific that we're advertising them on the front of our shirt. Kind of a shame they've even plastered it all over the training gear now, I won't wear one of our shirts that has that shite over it. Fortunately I loaded up on a bunch of Luke training tops without them on it last season!

I actually quite liked to gamble, and used to bet fairly often. It's never been something I've personally had an issue controlling, but it just hit me that I was helping support a bunch of absolute bastards that I'd much rather go out of business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting programme on R4 this morning: 

The Science of Addiction 

Quote

Addiction specialist Sally Marlow examines the science behind addiction to find out why so many people in Britain are hooked on drugs and alcohol. Neuroscientists now have a sophisticated understanding of the networks in the brain that can pull a person towards addiction and hold them there. Changes in the brain also help to explain why it can be so incredibly hard to quit. But brains don't act in isolation, and neuroscience doesn't explain everything. Why do some people get hooked in the first place while others, who use drugs recreationally, do not? How much of addiction is genetic, and how much does free will play a role? What about our social environments and life experiences? Addiction specialists have a good understanding of the complex web of factors that drive people towards addiction and know which treatments work. So why are addiction rates for many drugs at an all-time high? Does society even want to find the answers? Sally talks to some of the scientists who wrestle with these questions and to Mel, John, Lavinia and Kevin who reflect on their own experiences of addiction and recovery. 

 

Edited by mjmooney
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have to agree with the FUT thing. I've never actually spent money on packs, but the temptation is always there. I've heard some pretty bad stories about kids getting into it though, spending money on their parents credit/debit cards and racking up enormous bills with no clear knowledge of what they are doing, all in the act of hoping to pack a Messi, Ronaldo or team of the week player.

Since I've been playing FUT I've always worked hard building a team from scratch, adding decent players by grinding out games to accumulate coins. However playing online games against teams where people have blatantly spent 100's-1000's on packs and have the best team going is infuriating, especially in the first few weeks. I can see how people/kids can quickly get drawn into spending money on the hunt for players to sort their team out after getting battered 7-0 online.

It may sound stupid to some people, but with gaming as an addiction companies like EA abuse the use of FUT knowing that people will fall into the trap.

For those that do spend a lot of money on it each year, give it a go this year building a team without spending any 'real money'. It's infuriating, hard but incredibly rewarding.

 

Would also like to echo the appreciation for @kent_villa & @Rugeley Villa posts. Incredibly interesting insight into addiction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...
Â