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Lyngby (Danish football team)


Jesperchr
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When the different sources talk about funds potentially coming from ‘unnamed investors’ and the like, I would hazard a guess that Dr X/ Recon will be the investor. Therefore bypassing the concern that ‘Aston Villa’ are funding another team.

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1 hour ago, Rob182 said:

When the different sources talk about funds potentially coming from ‘unnamed investors’ and the like, I would hazard a guess that Dr X/ Recon will be the investor. Therefore bypassing the concern that ‘Aston Villa’ are funding another team.

Yarp - I think so, it doesn't make much sense otherwise - no money in the project equals very little control.

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23 hours ago, thabucks said:

Citeh were getting paid I think it was almost £10 million image & intellectual rights from each of there subsidiaries which is basically just a money moving excercise but it all counts.. 

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/how-are-big-spending-manchester-city-set-to-pass-uefas-financial-fair-play-rules-9097609.html%3famp

 

Wjn win for all of it comes off !

I read a good article the end of last week, cant remember where though, but it was saying Citeh's spending in January nearly made it certain that they have won their legal battle with UEFA over FFP.

FFP could be changing somewhat or even abolished because of it.  Think it was the telegraph it was in.

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8 minutes ago, HeyAnty said:

I read a good article the end of last week, cant remember where though, but it was saying Citeh's spending in January nearly made it certain that they have won their legal battle with UEFA over FFP.

FFP could be changing somewhat or even abolished because of it.  Think it was the telegraph it was in.

It was (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/2018/01/31/manchester-city-won-battle-uefa-keep-spending-big/)  

Perhaps someone who has access to this fully as i am at work could post

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38 minutes ago, HeyAnty said:

It was (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/2018/01/31/manchester-city-won-battle-uefa-keep-spending-big/)  

Perhaps someone who has access to this fully as i am at work could post

The rest is behind a paywall:

There is not a single mention of Uefa financial fairplay regulations in any of the 70 pages of Manchester City’s most recent financial report, and one can only assume that is because after ten years of fighting the power in Nyon, the club think they have finally won the battle.

The Abu Dhabi transformation of City has reached all parts of the club, a ferocious upscaling of an institution that was nowhere near its first-world competitors in 2008, and has done so in spite of FFP, the most intensive regulatory period in European football history. This window City have demonstrated that the club will buy the players Pep Guardiola wants, be that the long-term targets like Aymeric Laporte or the de...

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52 minutes ago, NurembergVillan said:

Premier League 2017-18: How Manchester City won the battle with UEFA to keep spending big

There is not a single mention of UEFA financial fair play regulations in any of the 70 pages of Manchester City’s most recent financial report, and one can only assume that is because after 10 years of fighting the power in Nyon, the club think they have finally won the battle.

The Abu Dhabi transformation of City has reached all parts of the club, a ferocious upscaling of an institution that was nowhere near its first-world competitors in 2008, and has done so in spite of FFP, the most intensive regulatory period in European football history.

Unlimited budget: Pep Guardiola. Unlimited budget: Pep Guardiola. Photo: AP
 

This window, City have demonstrated that the club will buy the players Pep Guardiola wants, be that the long-term targets such as Aymeric Laporte, or the decision to bid around £60 million on Riyad Mahrez, just in order to cover the injured Leroy Sane. The City team who won the Premier League titles of 2012 and 2014 have, with a few exceptions, been cleared out in the last three years, and replaced with the younger players that Guardiola has drilled into the runaway league leaders.

Yet the appetite of the club this window to push on again and consolidate a winning position – in the £57 million deal for Laporte, as well as the abandoned attempt to sign Mahrez – is the strongest example yet of their faith that their commercial expansion will keep pace.

How have they done it? City’s most recent accounts in November recorded record revenues, up to £473 million from £392 million the previous year.

The Deloitte Money League placed City in fifth place, behind Manchester United, Real Madrid, Barcelona and Bayern Munich, with a turnover of £528 million, although it would be right to say that both Manchester clubs have had growth relative to Eurozone rivals eaten up by the effect on the pound of post-Brexit referendum exchange rates. Factoring in a 15 per cent drop in the pound makes United’s performance, at the top of Europe, remarkable. As for City, that extra 15 per cent would have pushed them up to a revenue of around £610 million, ahead of Bayern on £588 million and on the tails of Barcelona and Madrid. It is this growth in revenue, which the club have driven year after year, which has given them the confidence that they will be able to back Guardiola, and suggests that the club believe there will be another major improvement in their commercial figures again this year.

Of course, the questions remain over the 10-year £400 million marquee deal with the Abu Dhabi airline Etihad Airways for stadium and shirt rights, although, signed in 2011, City have grown into the kind of club capable of commanding that figure. By contrast, Real Madrid, for instance, have been unable to get their naming rights deal with Abu Dhabi energy company IPIC over the line with the new Bernabeu because of the stalling of the rebuilding programme, while in the meantime City have used theirs as a platform to get more.

Their partnerships with Korean tyre manufacturer Nexen, German software company SAP, Israeli website development platform Wix, Australian vintners Wolf Blass and the US retail and content giant Amazon are some of those commercial deals. But the expectation is that there will be another leap forward in the next financial year and that the boldness in investing around £450 million in Guardiola’s squad, as well as salaries, in the last 18 months is a sign of that confidence.

The headline transfer figures are paid over the course of a player’s contract – Laporte, for instance, will represent £9 million in FFP terms this season – and there were clear signs in the last accounts, with small profits on player trading, that there was scope for an increase in investment in spite of what had already been paid to build Guardiola’s team. The wages to turnover ratio was at 56 per cent which also offers some leeway to the club’s controlling forces should they be forced into a quick decision by injury.

It is simply a continuation of the aggressive player acquisition that has driven on-field success and in turn the greater revenue that comes with it.

“Some clubs spend £300 million-£400 million on two players,” Guardiola said this week, “we spend £300 million on six players”. It has been critical that City can sell the success of the club to commercial partners in order to keep themselves FFP compliant and this season, more than ever, has proved to them that is possible.

Guardiola had wanted Alexis Sanchez, of course, a less expensive fee than Mahrez but a major investment in wages nonetheless and the club’s decision to pass up on the Chilean showed that there is a limit to what they are willing to pay. Neither are they prepared to leave it to the likes of teenagers Phil Foden and Brahim Diaz to fill whatever gaps they might perceive to have among their attacking players, when their whole philosophy has been based upon the ambitious acquisition of those who can slot in immediately.

The UEFA FFP rules permit clubs to lose no more than £30 million over the scope of three-year periods, and City Football Group’s entire structure is established with that in mind, including the four other satellite clubs in Australia, Japan, the United States and Uruguay. Last year, having complied with the conditions imposed by UEFA, their £60 million FFP fine from 2014 was reduced by £40 million, and the club looks impregnable to new UEFA measures.

City are in a position to deal with the expectation that FFP could change again to a simple net transfer cap of £100 million per year, and there may even be a time in the next 10 years when they rival the big four in Europe for a place at the very top of the aforementioned money league. Should they reach that point, their place in the establishment will be irreversible.

FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBT I DON'T HAVE A TORYGRAPH SUBSCRIPTION, I'M JUST HANDY ON GOOGLE.

Appreciate you going to the effort to post this. 

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9 hours ago, AvfcRigo82 said:

Was wondering this myself, still cannot find any update on anything anywhere on it yet.

They say a takeover is close, either by a local investment group, or a english club (Aston villa)
the latest news where that there would be a update today at 10.00, but i can't find anything about it.

But 4 of their best players has left on a free transfer, because they havnet gotten payed for last month. 

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Another Swedish article on them

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The management of Lyngby BK is a shame for Danish football

 

In 2001/2002 Lyngby BK was in the Danish High Court, but went bankrupt halfway. They lost players like Tobias Grahn and Ulrich Vinzents, and signed 30 amateur players. The rule then (it has changed) made them clear season, lost 14 of 15 matches, and had a goal difference of 7-55.

Only after that they were forced to move, but it only took five years to get back to the high court. Their academy also started players like Yussuf Poulsen (RB Salzburg), Emre Mor (Celta Vigo), and Anders Christiansen.

2014 looked fine: Hellerup Finans, who wrote on their website that they had "plant pain" of all successes, became Lyngby BK's new main owner. Though in a strange business.

The then management in Lyngby BK was initially left, thus fixing a sponsorship trip. It was reported in the media that the football club's management had invited the sponsors to a striker club. That there would have been a striker club was rejected by Hellerup Finans Owner Torben Jensen. He wanted to clarify that there was a club of prostitutes.

Jensen was cursed by the conduct of the management, and Hellerup Finans demanded that the leadership of Lyngby BK should resign so that they could put their own. Then it became.

At first it looked pretty good. It was discussed that the arena planes would be locked up, something that had been up since 2008. Last season, Lyngby ended BK trea in the Danish league, this summer they went third in the European League against strong Krasnodar (much because of two late Krasnodar goals) , and sold an 18-year-old to Inter for 15 million.

At the same time it was only the exterior that glittered. As early as spring 2016, the first headlines of bankruptcy were hit for Hellerup Finans, which invests in new start-up companies. Several financial journalists warned that they "promise more than they can hold" with their "very aggressive" methods to get new customers.

Several investors expressed concern and wanted a bankruptcy, which Torben Jensen was unrelated to.

- Of course, I accept that investors are angry, dissatisfied, and suspicious. That's all of us. But it's also about minimizing the loss and it's not done by calling the media and shouting "the wolf will come," he said, according to Business.dk.

Hellerup Finans fixed a new audit firm that would look through the company. They found "several fundamental errors". To quote Business.dk, it was "mildly expressed". Hellerup Finans's annual report went from plus SEK 30 million to minus 60 million. Their equity went from just over 110 million to minus 20 million.

They changed the audit firm when they thought it had been too critical.

Lyngby BK was in the Super League but, on the other hand, there were big problems. In 2014/2015 they went more than 16 million kronor back, the year after 33 million. They tried to get individuals to invest just over SEK 25 million in Lyngby BK during 2015/2016. They seem to have had trouble getting together five million.

Ifjol ended the three in Danish High Court, and received money from Hellerup Finans and private investors on seven occasions in the spring worth more than 40 million. Nevertheless, blood-red numbers were again: back 15 million and no money to survive a year to.

Hellerup Finans was again critical of an accountant, this time the club's auditor at Deloitte, and swapped.

Lyngby BK did not get license for this season, but Torben Jensen went in and guaranteed more money. It resolved, even though he was criticized by the Danish Football Association.

He had long talked about the sale of the club. The price has varied between SEK 60 million and a krone. It was rumored about potential buyers like Red Bull and investors from China, Dubai, and the United States. According to Jensen, the buyers from the United States were "very serious", but "it is important to emphasize that the club's future is not dependent on the negotiation of a sale."

It was a year ago. Half a year later, Jensen said that the club was no longer for sale. Now, six months later, they appear to be bankrupt.

Hellerup Finans has to bring in at least 55 million kronor to survive, Lyngby BK has to bring in a number of millions just to survive a short while.

Over the past week, Lyngby has set his genre ("it's not worth playing" said the head coach), and they can not play league matches in their regular arena because they can not afford plan heat. They also can not afford to rent another arena and have eliminated all the payers in the club except for players and leaders. However, players can now clear up new clubs without transition sums, as they have not been paid in January. According to the Tipsblad, two players have already decided to use it: Mikkel Rygaard and Swede Simon Strand (according to DT near Dalkurd).

The same Simon Strand bought from East more than a month ago. As Österreich's sports director Matias Concha said: it is quite unthinkable how Lyngby BK has even had to buy players. In theory, Öster has lost one of his best contract-based players for free to a totally newcomer in the last month.

Lyngby BK seems, despite the rumors that English clubs can buy them, therefore go bankrupt for the second time in 16 years. Despite that, Danish federations have allowed them to remain in the Super League until now, they were licensed for this season despite all warning signals, and also allowed them to win players. Time to review the regulations?

And another question: can we see several players from Lyngby hamna in allsvenskan 2018?

Sources: Tips, DBU, Finans.dk, BT, TV2, DT, Superstats, Transfer Market, Business.dk, Hellerup Finans, TV3.dk

https://www.fotbollskanalen.se/bloggar/allsvenska-bloggen/2018/02/07/hanteringen-av-lyngby-bk-ar-en-skam-for-dansk-fotboll/

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