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My investments are showing as being worth more than I paid but the liquidity is really low so it’s an unrealistic valuation. I’m hoping a load of people pile in like they did 3-4 years back. 

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On 03/01/2021 at 19:31, Genie said:

My investments are showing as being worth more than I paid but the liquidity is really low so it’s an unrealistic valuation. I’m hoping a load of people pile in like they did 3-4 years back. 

Loads won't at the current price, because they'll struggle to see it grow from here, after the initial boom, you rarely get many more, it all evens out over time because people know other people sell when it gets to a point. 

Bitcoin is weird. 

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On 03/01/2021 at 19:31, Genie said:

My investments are showing as being worth more than I paid but the liquidity is really low so it’s an unrealistic valuation. I’m hoping a load of people pile in like they did 3-4 years back. 

I think it depends what you're holding. I struggled to get a good price for altcoins when I consolidated but then sold the BTC quickly for about £24.5k and was able to basically get my initial investment back. 

After a BTC run like this you would expect an alt season coming next which would make a lot, but as Lalal says who knows as crypto is weird (why I'm glad to have less riding on it and anything that comes is now just a bonus). 

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6 hours ago, lapal_fan said:

Loads won't at the current price, because they'll struggle to see it grow from here, after the initial boom, you rarely get many more, it all evens out over time because people know other people sell when it gets to a point. 

Bitcoin is weird. 

Seeing this boom does give me a lot more confidence that if it crashes back down to 5 or 6k again that at some point it'll shoot back up. I'd happily buy back in again. 

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1 minute ago, Rds1983 said:

I think it depends what you're holding. I struggled to get a good price for altcoins when I consolidated but then sold the BTC quickly for about £24.5k and was able to basically get my initial investment back. 

After a BTC run like this you would expect an alt season coming next which would make a lot, but as Lalal says who knows as crypto is weird (why I'm glad to have less riding on it and anything that comes is now just a bonus). 

That’s the hope. BTC grabs the headlines and then people go looking for new value in the alts... let’s see. 

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I cashed out my BTC when it hit £21k - which, in hindsight, was the wrong call :D

Yesterday, though, I thought I'd try out some "day trading" to see if you can actually take advantage of the silliness surrounding crypto right now.  I 'tested' it out on Stellar Lumens (which seem to be doing well generally).  Have traded out maybe 3 or 4 times - incurring quite large fees on Coinbase - and have still moved from £600 yesterday morning to £710.55 now.  Silly.

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36 minutes ago, bobzy said:

On Christmas Eve, one Bitcoin was worth £17,231.27 - now, one is worth £30,681.05.  Crazy.

Even more annoyed Santa didn't give me the full BTC I asked for now! 

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We've all been there - brain fog makes us forget our password and after eight frantic attempts, we have just two left.

That's the situation for programmer Stefan Thomas but the stakes are higher than most - the forgotten password will let him unlock a hard drive containing $240m (£175m) worth of Bitcoin.

His plight, reported in the New York Times, has gone viral.

Ex-Facebook security head Alex Stamos has offered to help - for a 10% cut.

Mr Thomas, who was born in Germany but lives in San Francisco, was given 7,002 bitcoins as payment for making a video explaining how cryptocurrency works more than a decade ago. 

At the time, they were worth a few dollars each.

He stored them in an IronKey digital wallet on a hard drive. 

And he wrote the password on a piece of paper he has lost.

Own bank

After 10 failed attempts, the password will encrypt itself, making the wallet impossible to access.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the dilemma has put him off cryptocurrencies.

He told the New York Times: "The whole idea of being your own bank - let me put it this way, do you make your own shoes?"

"The reason we have banks is that we don't want to deal with all those things that banks do."

media captionBitcoin explained: How do crypto-currencies work?

Locked out

Mr Stamos, who is now professor at the Stanford Internet Observatory, tweeted Mr Thomas: "Um, for $220m in locked-up Bitcoin, you don't make 10 password guesses but take it to professionals to buy 20 IronKeys and spend six months finding a side channel or uncapping.

"I'll make it happen for 10%. 

"Call me."

Story

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On 13/01/2021 at 19:40, Genie said:

I'll see your £175m and raise you... 

https://amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/jan/14/man-newport-council-50m-helps-find-bitcoins-landfill-james-howells

"James Howells offers to share 25% of the £200m he claims is on hard drive he accidentally threw out in 2013. 

 

A computer engineer who claims he accidentally threw away a hard drive containing a virtual currency worth tens of millions of pounds has promised to give a local council a quarter of the fortune if they help him dig it out of a rubbish tip.

James Howells, 35, says the hard drive of his old laptop contains bitcoins worth about £200m but is languishing in a landfill site in Newport, south Wales.

Howells says both he and the council will benefit if they allow him to dig for it but the local authority is refusing, claiming an excavation would break licensing regulations and cause environmental damage. "

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