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NurembergVillan

On This Day In History

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At 5.15pm exactly 100 years ago, Brigadier-General Reginald Dyer marched into an area of scrubland about the size of Trafalgar Square in #JallianwalaBagh in Amritsar 50 fully armed infantry and ordered his troops to fire on a crowd of thousands....

Documentary tonight on channel 4 9pm. Worth watching. 

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A good proportion of the Villa fans in our school were strangely overcome by a mystery virus that day, myself included. The only treatment available was in some northern city

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On this day (and tomorrow) in 1912, the Titanic hit an iceberg and sunk. The iceberg was hit late on the 14th, with the sinking occurring in the early hours of the 15th

7018FE_DA_080929titanic.jpg

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1561 - The great UFO battle in the sky over Nuremburg. 

330px-Himmelserscheinung_%C3%BCber_N%C3%

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"In the morning of April 14, 1561, at daybreak, between 4 and 5 a.m., a dreadful apparition occurred on the sun, and then this was seen in Nuremberg in the city, before the gates and in the country – by many men and women. At first there appeared in the middle of the sun two blood-red semi-circular arcs, just like the moon in its last quarter. And in the sun, above and below and on both sides, the color was blood, there stood a round ball of partly dull, partly black ferrous color. Likewise there stood on both sides and as a torus about the sun such blood-red ones and other balls in large number, about three in a line and four in a square, also some alone. In between these globes there were visible a few blood-red crosses, between which there were blood-red strips, becoming thicker to the rear and in the front malleable like the rods of reed-grass, which were intermingled, among them two big rods, one on the right, the other to the left, and within the small and big rods there were three, also four and more globes. These all started to fight among themselves, so that the globes, which were first in the sun, flew out to the ones standing on both sides, thereafter, the globes standing outside the sun, in the small and large rods, flew into the sun. Besides the globes flew back and forth among themselves and fought vehemently with each other for over an hour. And when the conflict in and again out of the sun was most intense, they became fatigued to such an extent that they all, as said above, fell from the sun down upon the earth 'as if they all burned' and they then wasted away on the earth with immense smoke. After all this there was something like a black spear, very long and thick, sighted; the shaft pointed to the east, the point pointed west. Whatever such signs mean, God alone knows. Although we have seen, shortly one after another, many kinds of signs on the heaven, which are sent to us by the almighty God, to bring us to repentance, we still are, unfortunately, so ungrateful that we despise such high signs and miracles of God. Or we speak of them with ridicule and discard them to the wind, in order that God may send us a frightening punishment on account of our ungratefulness. After all, the God-fearing will by no means discard these signs, but will take it to heart as a warning of their merciful Father in heaven, will mend their lives and faithfully beg God, that He may avert His wrath, including the well-deserved punishment, on us, so that we may temporarily here and perpetually there, live as his children. For it, may God grant us his help, Amen. By Hanns Glaser, letter-painter of Nurnberg."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1561_celestial_phenomenon_over_Nuremberg

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Also today in 1986 the heaviest hailstones ever recorded fell in Gopalganj District, Bangladesh weighing in at 1.02 kg (2.25 lb). 92 people died.

In other hail related events it is also the 20th anniversary of the 1999 Sydney hailstorm causing damage across New South Wales that cost an estimated A$2.3 billion. Dropping an estimated 500,000 tonnes of hail in it's wake.

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It's 30 years to the day since the Hillsborough tragedy. It's about 20 to 3 as I write this. Crazy to think right now people would have been walking towards the ground excited about an FA cup semi-final

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3 hours ago, VILLAMARV said:

It's 30 years to the day since the Hillsborough tragedy. It's about 20 to 3 as I write this. Crazy to think right now people would have been walking towards the ground excited about an FA cup semi-final

I remember it quite clearly. I would have been 9 years old. First tragedy I think I ever remember. 

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1 hour ago, Xela said:

I remember it quite clearly. I would have been 9 years old. First tragedy I think I ever remember. 

Now that DOES make me feel old. 

I was 35. 

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Quite a grim day in history really.

Lincoln died after being shot in the theatre on the previous night too (1865)

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2 hours ago, Xela said:

I remember it quite clearly. I would have been 9 years old. First tragedy I think I ever remember. 

I was 13. I had got the train to Shrewsbury with my mate and spent the day hoovering up all the cheap 20p 7" singles we could find in Woolworths. I will never forget getting home, running past my mum in the kitchen to stick the telly on to check ceefax, to be met with that on the news :(

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107 years ago today, and the day after the Titanic sunk, the first female flight over the channel

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Harriet Quimby was an early American aviator and a movie screenwriter. In 1911, she was awarded a U.S. pilot's certificate by the Aero Club of America, becoming the first woman to gain a pilot's license in the United States. In 1912, she became the first woman to fly across the English Channel. Although Quimby lived only to the age of 37, she influenced the role of women in aviation.

After earning her license, the "Dresden China Aviatrix" or "China Doll," as the press called her because of her petite stature and fair skin, moved to capitalize on her new notoriety. Pilots could earn as much as $1,000 per performance, and prize money for a race could go as high as $10,000 or more. Quimby joined the Moisant International Aviators, an exhibition team, and made her professional debut, earning $1,500, in a night flight over Staten Island before a crowd of almost 20,000 spectators. As one of the country's few female pilots, she capitalized on her femininity by wearing trousers tucked into high lace boots accentuated by a plum-colored satin blouse, necklace, and antique bracelet. She drew crowds whenever she competed in cross-country meets and races. As part of the exhibition team, she showcased her talents around the United States and even went to Mexico City at the end of 1911 to participate in aviation activities held in honor of the inauguration of President Francisco Madero.

On April 16, 1912, Quimby took off from Dover, England, en route to Calais, France, and made the flight in 59 minutes, landing about 25 miles (40 km) from Calais on a beach in Équihen-Plage, Pas-de-Calais. She became the first woman to pilot an aircraft across the English Channel. Her accomplishment received little media attention, however, as the sinking of the RMS Titanic the day before consumed the interest of the public and filled newspapers

On July 1, 1912, she flew in the Third Annual Boston Aviation Meet at Squantum, Massachusetts. Although she had obtained her ACA certificate to be allowed to participate in ACA events, the Boston meet was an unsanctioned contest. Quimby flew out to Boston Light in Boston Harbor at about 3,000 feet, then returned and circled the airfield. William A.P. Willard, the organizer of the event and father of the aviator Charles Willard, was a passenger in her brand-new two-seat Bleriot monoplane. At an altitude of 1,000 feet (300 m) the aircraft unexpectedly pitched forward for reasons still unknown. Both Willard and Quimby were ejected from their seats and fell to their deaths, while the plane "glided down and lodged itself in the mud"

Harriet_Quimby,_by_Theodore_Marceau.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Quimby

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On 15/04/2019 at 14:42, VILLAMARV said:

It's 30 years to the day since the Hillsborough tragedy. It's about 20 to 3 as I write this. Crazy to think right now people would have been walking towards the ground excited about an FA cup semi-final

I was driving to see my girlfriend late that afternoon and happened to pull alongside a coach of everton fans who'd just seen their team beat Watford at villa park. I looked across and all of them (that i could see) were just gazing out back at me, totally folorn and in disbelief, probably wondering if their mates/family were ok.

Haunting.

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18 minutes ago, VILLAMARV said:

 

Norwich IIRC. The most forgotten semi-final surely.

Yes, you're right. 

I'm confusing myself with the distant memory that Watford had a goalkeeper crisis for a semi final and I'm sure some bloke who helped run a wine bar down south but played occasionally had to step in ? 

Was it even watford ? Jeez... I'm getting old !

Edited by mottaloo

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21 hours ago, VILLAMARV said:

Quite a grim day in history really.

Lincoln died after being shot in the theatre on the previous night too (1865)

Can add Notre Dame to that awful day as well. 

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