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Brain injury - Concussion


VILLAMARV
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Cant find a similar thread but merge it as ever mods if there is. Just noticed Iwan Roberts calling for the Welsh FA to stop under 10's heading footballs.

BBC

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Under 10s should be banned from heading footballs, former Wales striker Iwan Roberts has said. A study by the University of Stirling suggested it caused instant, short term changes to the brain. Mr Roberts said the Football Association of Wales (FAW) could be brave and make this "correct decision".

The Stirling study article from October 2016:

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Heading a football can significantly affect a player's brain function and memory for 24 hours, a study has found.

Researchers said they had identified "small but significant changes in brain function" after players headed the ball 20 times. Memory performance was reduced by between 41% and 67% in the 24 hours after routine heading practice. One of the study's authors suggested football should be avoided ahead of important events like exams.

The University of Stirling study was published in EBioMedicine. It is the first to detect direct changes in the brain after players were exposed to everyday head impacts, as opposed to clinical brain injuries like concussion.

also BBC

Thoughts?

 

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I said it before but I think if a number of lawsuits happened then its potential they could eventually ban heading or all players wear them Cech helmets. I dont think football is as bad as American Football, Ice Hockey and Rugby for brain injuries but I can see a change in the future

English football be **** if banned heading, they wouldnt know what to do with their feet

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The old footballs that they used to use back in the old days when they were really heavy, especially when wet I think did a lot of damage. so many footballers from the 60s and 70s have now got dementia, i'm sure there must be a link.

Edited by PaulC
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33 minutes ago, PaulC said:

The old footballs that they used to use back in the old days when they were really heavy, especially when wet I think did a lot of damage. so many footballers from the 60s and 70s have now got dementia, i'm sure there must be a link.

Even in my day the old mitre ones were evil. Especially on a winters day. Not good, you really felt a ringing for a good few seconds.

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I agree, but I'd extend it to u15's.

There's so much going on at that age with development, practicing headers exclusively shouldn't be allowed. 

It's incredibly difficult to enforce, but maybe even just making people aware of the damage will let them make the choices.  

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UEFA are commissioning research....

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Uefa has commissioned a research project that will examine the links between dementia and playing football. Tentative research published earlier this week suggested repeated headers during a player's career may be linked to   long-term brain damage.The research examined the brains of six players renowned for heading the ball - all of whom later developed dementia. The Football Association has said it will look at the area more closely, but is yet to announce its own study. European football's governing body Uefa says the project, which will begin on Friday, "aims to help establish the risk posed to young players during matches and training sessions". One Premier League club will be involved in the study.

Beeb again

And that's following the results of the UK research that was out in the media yesterday.

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Researchers from University College London and Cardiff University examined the brains of five people who had been professional footballers and one who had been a committed amateur throughout his life. They had played football for an average of 26 years and all six went on to develop dementia in their 60s. While performing post mortem examinations, scientists found signs of brain injury - called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in four cases. CTE has been linked to memory loss, depression and dementia and has been seen in other contact sports.

Prof Huw Morris, of University College London, told the BBC: "When we examined their brains at autopsy we saw the sorts of changes that are seen in ex-boxers, the changes that are often associated with repeated brain injury which are known as CTE.", "So really for the first time in a series of players we have shown that there is evidence that head injury has occurred earlier in their life which presumably has some impact on them developing dementia."

In the study, published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica, the report's authors make it clear they were not analysing the risks of heading by children.

But the science is far from clear-cut. Each brain also showed signs of Alzheimer's disease and some had blood vessel changes that can also lead to dementia. Researchers speculate that it was a combination of factors that contributed to dementia in these players. But they acknowledge their research cannot definitively prove a link between football and dementia and are calling for larger studies to look at footballers' long-term brain health.

yesterdays jam

 

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On 2/13/2017 at 13:57, VILLAMARV said:

Cant find a similar thread but merge it as ever mods if there is. Just noticed Iwan Roberts calling for the Welsh FA to stop under 10's heading footballs.

BBC

The Stirling study article from October 2016:

also BBC

Thoughts?

 

For some time now i have been asked not to encourage develoment players to head the ball , you get to a stage (usually around 10-11 ) where heading the ball becomes a natural reaction

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