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The now-enacted will of (some of) the people


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Just now, Davkaus said:

You'd often be forgiven for thinking the UK government has as well, so you're not alone.

I do have an Atlas, I just haven’t sat down and read the whole thing.

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34 minutes ago, KenjiOgiwara said:

Have to admit. I actually had to google to see if you still were in the EU. I've lost track of this stuff completely. You're in, you're out. You're like Norway, but you're not. Something about Ireland, but it doesn't work. Very very confusing to me 😁

We've left but are on the grace period where nothing changes while everyone works out how everything changes.

We'll be out out in the New Year.

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As the tweeter goes on to say, there is no suggestion that the HO have broken the WA Citizens' rights chapter but they've missed an opportunity to address an issue. I would add, perhaps/probably not unintentionally.

Don't imagine that there won't be some very bad outcomes from the Settlement Scheme.

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Brexit: EU citizens in UK could be shut out of vital services

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Fears that shift from paper to digital permits could prevent those with settled status accessing jobs, banking and healthcare

Thousands of EU nationals could face problems accessing essential services because the government is refusing to issue physical proof of their right to live in the UK.

The settlement scheme grants EU citizens the right to remain in the UK after Brexit. Unlike other foreign nationals, they are not provided with a biometric residency permit proving their status.

Instead they have to access the Home Office’s online database each time they need to produce evidence of eligibility.

...

Elisabeth Dodds had the offer of a £50,000 home improvement loan rescinded when her bank insisted on proof of her status.

“I submitted both a copy of my letter from the Home Office confirming that I had been granted settled status, as well as the share code for checking my status online,” she said.

“Royal Bank of Scotland [RBS] refused to accept this information. On advice from a loan adviser, I printed out the Home Office documents, including screenshots from the Home Office website showing I have indefinite leave, and brought it into a bank branch.

“This was also rejected. I was variously told they had never heard of settled status and were powerless to change what form of proof they could accept.”

...

The government is refusing to change its stance and issue backup permits, despite its own assessment concluding that a digital only service could disadvantage many users.

The Home Office said its policy was part of a move to digitalise the entire immigration service. “Physical documents expire, become invalid, or can be lost, stolen or tampered with,” a spokesperson said.

“A digital status is more secure and ensures that EU citizens who are granted status in the UK can constantly access and securely share proof of their status. We see no reason why any institution should not accept a migrant’s online information as evidence of immigration status and will be launching an extensive package of communications to ensure individuals, employers, landlords and other third parties are fully aware of the move to digital.”

 

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2 hours ago, snowychap said:

Lessons learned from Windrush seem conspicuously missing here. It almost seems like they just don't care.

Still it's all worth it because we are taking back control. I can't tell you what a relief it will be to not have to follow all those European laws anymore on Freedom Day.

Please don't ask what taking back control means or what specific laws I won't have to follow or chances are I'll just get aggressive and accuse you of not being patriotic.

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Unsurprisingly, the EU negotiating team is treating the UK with a lot more mistrust than a month ago. Threats of breaking international law tend to have that effect. Difficult to see much progress without significant retreats by the likes of Gove.

Ireland's PM now publicly saying he is planning for a hard, no deal scenario.

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This appears to have gone unnoticed by the MSM

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Brexit travel permits designed to avoid 7,000-lorry jams come January depend on software that won't be finished till April

Beta means fully operational? Haha! Good one!

A UK government system to avoid miles of road traffic congestion in the county of Kent as the Brexit transition period comes to an end will rely on software which is not yet in its beta version.

Following the announcement this week that the government would introduce Kent Access Permits to ensure heavy goods vehicles travelling to the port of Dover and the Folkestone Eurotunnel crossing do not set off without the proper paperwork, the transport industry was quick to point out Whitehall had not begun testing the technology on which they would depend.

The business-as-usual Brexit transition period is set to end on 1 January 2021, and freight travelling between the UK and the EU's common Economic Area (aka the single market) will be subject to customs checks for the first time in decades.

The Register

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Their thoughts on "beta" amuses me. By definition, it's not ready to be released. It should be feature complete, but not really suitable for use in production yet. Early adopters are welcome, at their own risk. 

So, what's the backup plan if this thing shits itself in real world use? We're not talking about early access to a new game, here. 

And how the **** did we get here. What the **** have these charlatans been doing for 4 years? Has it suddenly come as a surprise that we're leaving? 

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1 hour ago, Genie said:

It was always going to come down to the last minute. Whether we had 1 year, 2, 5 or 10 years.

Brits are primed to think the EU always reaches agreement at the last minute because they have decades of experience of UK media reports on European Council negotiations. The Council is when the German Chancellor and British PM and French President and all the other heads of state meet to trash things like budgets out. It’s a within-EU deal, and often goes to the wire. In the background everyone knows the budget needs to be agreed or the EU institutions stop functioning.

This time is different. The UK’s team are dealing with Barnier and the European Commission. From an EU perspective, we are negotiating with an outsider. A rival, even. There’s no common bond like there is within the Council, it’s not an internal matter. Even if there’s no deal, the ECJ will still have a budget to pay the judges’ wages.

And that’s before the fact that a trade deal will have to go to the European Parliament for approval. The Parliament will want at least a few days to review, more likely a few weeks.

Holding out to the last minute just isn’t going to work this time. The British public’s failure to understand the basics of how the EU functions (not necessarily including you, Genie) might bite them again.

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1 hour ago, Enda said:

Holding out to the last minute just isn’t going to work this time. The British public’s failure to understand the basics of how the EU functions (not necessarily including you, Genie) might bite them again.

Last minute in this instance is the middle of October conference isn’t it? I’ve seen it mentioned that this will be the last opportunity to strike a deal and get it all ratified and legislated by the end of the year.

If that is the end stop then both sides would always go right up to it and see who concedes at the last moment. No point in agreeing something or pulling out (insert KW) 6 months ahead of that point.

Maybe it’s time for Boris to get personally involved?

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Mid-October is a Boris-mandated deadline. Barnier is more flexible and wants it wrapped up by end-October. Realistically it could go into November and still receive approval, but it’d be pushing it. The more contentious the deal, the more time the Parliament will want to scrutinise it.

IMHO the degree of feasible concessions is asymmetric. The deal needs approval from the EU Parliament, but not the HoC. So even if Barnier conceded everything completely, absolutely everything, that might actually not be in the UK’s interest because the Parliament would just say no.

Maybe I’m biased but I just can’t see this playing out well for the UK.

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20 minutes ago, Genie said:

Last minute in this instance is the middle of October conference isn’t it?

According to the UK. The Commission and European Parliament  have said October 31st. The UK position is that at the Council meeting of 15th October, all the European leaders suddenly cave in and agree to all the stuff that Britain wants. 

21 minutes ago, Genie said:

Maybe it’s time for Boris to get personally involved?

To do what?

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1 minute ago, ml1dch said:

To do what?

I dunno, but every few weeks he makes a big fuss about getting “personally involved” in something he should have been involved in all along.

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