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villa4europe
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Bad day for fans...

The Football Supporters’ Federation has expressed bitter disappointment that Premier League clubs failed to back a measure to cap away ticket prices at their most recent meeting, while Liverpool have expressed dismay at the news that some of their supporters are to stage a walkout from Saturday’s game against Sunderland in protest at the new Anfield pricing structure.

It is understood that while no vote was taken on away tickets at Thursday’s meeting of all the Premier League clubs, informal soundings were taken that made it clear the proposal would not received the two thirds majority required. Discussions are continuing about whether clubs, promised a £8.3bn bounty from broadcasting rights, will agree to an across-the-board cap on away prices or seek instead to boost the existing away fans ticket fund.


The FSF chief executive, Kevin Miles, who has been leading its Twenty’s Plenty campaign for a £20 cap, said: “We are incredibly disappointed to learn that a proposed cap on away ticket prices was voted down by the Premier League clubs yesterday in a secret ballot. Supporters will not let them off the hook.

“Football supporters are right to be angry about the Premier League clubs’ apparent reluctance to tackle the problem of ticket prices. “Top-flight clubs have known since last year that they will be receiving a huge increase in their TV revenues. In the light of that windfall, Premier League clubs cannot justify maintaining high ticket prices, particularly for away fans.”

He added: “Despite clubs failing to agree a way forward yesterday, this issue will not go away and fans will continue to fight for fair ticket prices. We understand that the Premier League will be working with clubs over the coming weeks to find a way forward. That must result in meaningful action on away prices at the next shareholders’ meeting at the end of March. If clubs have the will to do this there must be a way.”

Arsenal fans this week complained that the club was asking season ticket holders for a surcharge of up to £30 for their home Champions League tie against Barcelona, while Liverpool fans are up in arms about next season’s ticket prices.

It is understood that most clubs largely agree on the need for action on away ticket prices, having accepted that they are crucial to providing the atmosphere that helps maintain the Premier League’s broadcasting income.

But some clubs are believed to be reluctant to agree a universal cap for fear that it will erode their ability to set their own prices or could lead to complaints from home fans who sit in equivalent seats but pay more.

Instead, they favour an increase to the away fans fund, which currently stands at £200,000 per club per season and can be spent however each individual club sees fit. The FSF would like to see both a cap and an increase to the fund, as well as a commitment to continue to engage on wider ticket pricing issues.

The matter will now be discussed again at the next meeting of Premier League clubs in late March, which will be their last before next season’s prices are set.

Arsenal denied that they were among the clubs against movement on ticket prices, but are understood to favour an increase in the fund rather than a price cap. “We argued for the most extensive package of support for travelling fans and we are sure there will be a good solution,” said a spokesman.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2016/feb/05/premier-league-snubs-cap-away-ticket-prices

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Ahead of Anfield's new Main Stand opening for the start of the 2016-17 season, Liverpool FC have released the pricing and ticket structure, with the club maintaining its focus on bringing more local supporters and young people into the stadium.

  • 64 per cent of season ticket prices will decrease or freeze.
  • 45 per cent of matchday tickets will see a price decrease.
  • Local fans given priority access to over 20,000 tickets across the Premier League season, with prices starting from as little as £9.
  • Over 20,000 extra tickets allocated across the Premier League season, in a new pricing category, for fans aged between 17 and 21.
  • Over 1,000 free tickets across the Premier League season to local kids through a new Young Fan Initiative scheme.
  • 13 months' consultation with the Ticket Working Group listening to what are priorities for match-going fans.

Local fans will now be able to attend a category C game for as little as £9 following the introduction of over 20,000 tickets across the season with priority access given to local supporters.

Young fans also remain a focus and the club will introduce a new concession category for 17 to 21-year-olds which will provide over 1,000 extra tickets for each Premier League match for young supporters during next season.

The club will launch a new initiative working in partnership with local schools based in and around Merseyside to offer over 1,000 free incentive-based tickets.

The club has continued the practice of stretching prices across the ground to reflect seat location, resulting in 64 per cent of season tickets freezing or going down in price. Season ticket prices will range from £685 (£36 per game) to £1029 (£54 per game). Matchday tickets have also stretched, making the cheapest matchday ticket just £9 and the most expensive £77 depending on seat location. The under 17s junior season ticket remains at £180 (£9.47 per game). The club's new Young Adult price band will see 17 to 21-year-old season ticket holders enjoy a 50 per cent discount whilst our disabled season ticket holders and other concessions will continue to receive a 25 per cent discount on their seats.

Today's announcement follows a 13-month consultation with the Ticket Working Group, a sub-group of the official Liverpool FC Supporters' Committee, which has met regularly with the club over the last year to discuss affordability and accessibility of tickets.

Ian Ayre, chief executive officer, Liverpool FC, said: “With the opening of our expanded Main Stand, the club is heading into a new chapter and we want as many of our fans right there with us to support the team at Anfield.

“We always carefully consider ticket pricing to ensure the long-term sustainability and competitiveness of the club, while listening to the views of our match-going fans to understand the priorities around accessibility and affordability.

“The feedback has been clear that having more local and young people at Anfield is a priority and we are delighted to be launching these new ticketing initiatives. The redevelopment of our Main Stand and increased capacity has given us flexibility to freeze or reduce more than half of all tickets across the stadium, which is reflected in our longer-term plan to give fans more choice on what price they pay to attend a game. 

“We would like to thank our fans in the Ticket Working Group for their commitment, engagement, cooperation and time throughout this process. There was agreement from the start that compromise was essential in working together to find solutions to increase accessibility and affordability of tickets. We recognise the incredible importance of ticket pricing to our match-going fans and we take the responsibility very seriously in determining pricing at Anfield.

“We are excited about our new Main Stand opening and look forward to welcoming 8,500 additional fans to Anfield next season to support the team.”

http://www.liverpoolfc.com/news/announcements/205690-lfc-announces-new-16-17-ticket-structure-9-ticket-and-free-tickets-for-schools

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Arsenal fans are furious at being forced to pay more for their season tickets because of the Gunners' continual cup success.

Supporters will have to pay a surcharge of up to £30 on their annual tickets because of their progression to the Champions League knockout stages.

If the Gunners were to knock out Barcelona and reach the quarter-finals, fans will again expect further surcharges added to their accounts for next season.

Arsenal supply their gold members, as they call season tickets, with seven cup credits through the season.

Although the Barcelona clash in February is the seventh home cup match of the campaign, the additional charge comes in because it has been classed as a 'category A' fixture.

An email sent to supporters read: “As a result of our continued progress in cup competitions this season, our FA Cup Fifth Round home match against Hull City on the weekend of 19/20/21/22 February is the sixth cup credit for the 2015/16 season and will be a category C match.

“Consequently, our UEFA Champions League Round of 16 fixture against FC Barcelona, to be played on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 will be our seventh cup tie credit of the season and has been designated as a category A fixture.

Supporters are expected to be allowed to opt out of the Barcelona game and surrender their season to general sale if they do not agree with the surcharge..

But the club have defended themselves, saying if the Arsenal's cup opposition had been especially poor this season they may have even offered fans a refund.

Arsenal spokesperson said: "Each Arsenal season ticket includes admission to all 19 home Premier League matches, as well as the first seven home cup ties in European competitions and the FA Cup. The structure of each season ticket is based on six category A matches; 14 category B matches; and six category C matches.

"Depending on the number of matches played in a season and the categories assigned to them, this could result in a refund or additional cost to the price of each season ticket. For example, season ticket holders received a refund on this season’s prices, due to the categorisation of matches last season.

"For this current season, due to the number of matches played and the categories assigned to them, we have communicated to all season ticket holders that there will be an additional cost, which will be added to the season ticket price for next season. Each season ticket holder will be contacted to advise them of the figure which will be added to their renewal price for next season. This cost will range between £7 and £30."

 

Charging Arsenal season ticket holders a Barca surcharge is an insult. At the worst possible time as well.
Incredible greed.

— Russell Deal (@rustysheppey) February 5, 2016

The #Arsenal season ticket surcharge email is just odd. Being charged an extra 1% on my season ticket. By a club that has £100m in the bank.

— Darren Lewis (@dazlewis) February 5, 2016

Genius move by Arsenal board of raising ticket prices for Barca game, thereby ensuring no one is there to witness the drubbing.

— Arsene Wenger 33179 (@Wenger33179) February 5, 2016

Ticket surcharge by @Arsenal for Barcelona game is a sickening breach of trust. Can't see #Barca doing this to their own @GoonerFanzine

— Raffi Varoujian (@RVaroujian) February 5, 2016

The surcharge comes as fans elsewhere in the Premier League prepare to protest over ticket prices.

Liverpool have just offered season tickets for over £1,000 for the first time, while a match-day ticket could cost up to £77.

Supporters groups have joined forces and are planning a walkout during the gameagainst Sunderland this weekend in the 77th minute of the match.

Edited by villa4europe
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Ultimately if the demand is there clubs will keep charging what they can get away with it.

If there were empty away ends at likes of Anfield and Old Trafford then clubs would be forced to reconsider but it dosen't happen. Same with season tickets, people forgoing holidays so they can afford it.

And another problem is if loyal fans get priced out, then tourists or affulent fans will just take their place and the money will come rolling in.

The ironic thing is Arsenal is probably one of the better value away games out there if you're not Category A. Couple of times I've gone down in last 5 years I'm sure I've paid 30 or 35 quid for the ticket.

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It's sort of a price-inelastic market, many fans are addicts, so it kind of makes sense to raise prices (from that perspective). But I do suspect there's a limit to this, where it simply becomes too unaffordable. 

Atmospheres are shit compared to what they used to be as increasingly more middle class and tourists fill stadiums in place of genuine fans who can't afford to go as often. 

I imagine that there will be unprecedented moves from hardcore fans in the not too distant future to take direct action against owners, this may include boycotting various games. I don't think it can go on like this too long.

At the end of the day, the worst thing to ever happen to English football is BSkyB.

Edited by Dr_Pangloss
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Avg wage in UK in 2016 = £25,000

After tax/ni that = £77 per day

It should not take a days work to afford a ticket to a 2 hour long event.

It should be 20 quid, 30 quid MAX (for londoners or something) for a football ticket.

Edited by lapal_fan
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53 minutes ago, lapal_fan said:

 

It should be 20 quid, 30 quid MAX (for londoners or something) for a football ticket.

Agree completely. considering how much football clubs make from TV rights they should be lowering ticket prices to make it better for fans. After all, having fans in the ground makes it a better experience for those watching on TV, which is where the Premier Leagues main focus is. 

 

It's funny how they have to bring in FFP for clubs because they are spending too much money, but there's no mention of a ticket price cap for fans who are forced to spend loads of money.

 

Edited by PieFacE
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the problem is the belief that these tickets that are aimed at hard working locals, they might as well just make it £100 and throw in a trip to the beatles museum...

if you are unhappy about the pricing at anfield and decide not to go then there will be plenty of day trippers willing to take your place

thats why i agree with the attack on away ticket prices which should be finding their way in to the hands of fans with at least some sort of ticket history and likely a ST or some sort of away scheme / membership, i understand what role football tourism is currently playing at the bigger boys but dont drag away fans in to it too

the problem with that is the belief that they actually want away fans there at all...

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41 minutes ago, villa4europe said:

the problem with that is the belief that they actually want away fans there at all...

Oh they do. They really do. Because all the lovely telly money (Mmmm, Money) they get is due in large part to the full grounds and crowd noise - often away fan generated - and so on. Taking it on, if games were played in front of empty or half empty stadiums or with empty away stands, then the "product" would look like something people are not bothered about attending. Instant devaluation of TV rights.

So though they want crowds, they know that enough people will currently pay high prices, so they might as well charge them.

They are shameless, avaricious, bawbags.  

 

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15 minutes ago, blandy said:

If games were played in front of empty or half empty stadiums or with empty away stands, then the "product" would look like something people are not bothered about attending. Instant devaluation of TV rights.

 

 

Thats how serie A has been since the 90's

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The one and only way ticket prices will fall is a massive drop in attendances, and the clubs know that this is never likely to happen. 

Its like fags, I remember saying I'd quit if they ever hit £2, then it was £2.50, £3 and so on, fans will find the money. The clubs know this and that's what makes the pricing all the more unpleasant, especially as revenue from gate receipt's are such a very small % of a clubs revenue. 

That huge revenue comes from TV company's who want to see full stadiums, boycott and the prices will fall. 

Sadly i can't see it happening. 

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9 minutes ago, KHV said:

Thats how serie A has been since the 90's

That's what I was thinking of. italian togger used to be on Channel 4, but to quote the Sleaford mods, no one's bothered any more.

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4 hours ago, blandy said:

Oh they do. They really do. Because all the lovely telly money (Mmmm, Money) they get is due in large part to the full grounds and crowd noise - often away fan generated - and so on. Taking it on, if games were played in front of empty or half empty stadiums or with empty away stands, then the "product" would look like something people are not bothered about attending. Instant devaluation of TV rights.

So though they want crowds, they know that enough people will currently pay high prices, so they might as well charge them.

They are shameless, avaricious, bawbags.  

 

how many home fans actually do get really loud? Palace, Stoke maybe Everton the rest of the teams it can be like watching the theatre at times from the TV

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The price of tickets in the Premier League is just mad, and I'm aware I'm part of the problem being a foreign supporter visiting a couple of times a year. The price of an average ticket for the regular match going fan should never be more then €15 - 25 whether it's the Bundesliga or the League of Ireland. How low income workers in England can afford to regularly go to home and away games is beyond me. 

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