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What Does Your Surname Signify?

Surnames  

31 members have voted

  1. 1. What Does Your Surname Signify?

    • Occupation
      8
    • Geographic Location
      9
    • Description (Physical or Otherwise)
      8
    • Other
      6


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 What does your surname say about where and who you came from?

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Depending on which website you believe, it either means, someone who is or acts regal / someone given a title by winning a contest of skill, someone who lived by a river or stream, someone who is timid, or just named after a female deer. Almost certainly of Celtic origin. 

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"Brookes is a surname of Germanic/French origin, that is thought to have been derived from the condition of either residing near a stream (or brook)."

So I'm guessing that's geographical.

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My surname is related to a colour, although it's complicated. My surname is rare and Scottish.

Edited by Plastic Man

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My surname is related to a colour, although it's complicated.

beige?

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My surname is related to a colour, although it's complicated. My surname is rare and Scottish.

Glenfiddich 1937?

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My surname is related to a colour, although it's complicated. My surname is rare and Scottish.

Glenfiddich 1937?

 

Haha. If it was rare and Scottish, it would be something like, "Sconesober."

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I have a double barrel surname. 

 

One is an occupation, someone who plays the Harp. The other is a description, someone who used to live near a pit :D

Edited by PieFacE

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My surname, Michelsen, simply means (translated into English) son of Michael. Unlike your average -son name, though, I actually know how it came to be the family name.

My ancestors on my father's father's side immigrated, as did many, to the coast of northern Norway from the famished border regions of Finland and Sweden. The Finnish speaking minority kept old naming traditions longer than most of the rest of Europe. Eventually, though, the name Mikkelsen (son of Mikkel) stuck. Meanwhile, Danish was still very much the preferred written language of official Norway. Thus, the double k-spelling was replaced by my great grandfather to the more continental ch-spelling. Presumably as an effort to assimilate into mainstream society, in an era where ethnic minorities were heavily discriminated against in Norway.

I take pride in my name because of its history. My ancestors lived through some hard times, and I admire them a great deal.

Edited by Michelsen
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I kind of have a double barrel surname too.

 

One means descendant of the hawk/one-eyed one the other one seems to come from a first name.

Edited by packoman
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My name occurs on the UK census approx 100 times in the last 175 years and has no obvious meaning. other than a suggestion its a variation on St Paul.

Personally, a suspicious lack of relatives and back story leads me to think my parents were relocated on some sort of witness protection programme. 

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death

 

And for that randomly interesting and interestingly random insertion of the word "death," I thank you.

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My surname, Michelsen, simply means (translated into English) son of Michael. Unlike your average -son name, though, I actually know how it came to be the family name.

My ancestors on my father's father's side immigrated, as did many, to the coast of northern Norway from the famished border regions of Finland and Sweden. The Finnish speaking minority kept old naming traditions longer than most of the rest of Europe. Eventually, though, the name Mikkelsen (son of Mikkel) stuck. Meanwhile, Danish was still very much the preferred written language of official Norway. Thus, the double k-spelling was replaced by my great grandfather to the more continental ch-spelling. Presumably as an effort to assimilate into mainstream society, in an era where ethnic minorities were heavily discriminated against in Norway.

I take pride in my name because of its history. My ancestors lived through some hard times, and I admire them a great deal.

Do you have Sami blood?

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Surprisingly, my name means "Son of Stephen".

 

I've been told in the past that it originated in Grimsby, which made me think it may have gotten here from Scandinavia (especially given the "son").

 

But a google tells me it's earliest appearance was in Huntingdonshire, and is probably of Norman origin (which I guess could be Scandinavia originally?)

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I'm sure the vikings did some pillaging around normandy

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