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leviramsey

Possibly interesting maps...

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On 22/01/2019 at 11:07, Chindie said:

This reminds me of a friend of mine who insists that 'the South' in the UK is literally London and Kent, and everything else is the North.

I used to work with a Geordie bloke who insisted 'The South' started at South Shields.  

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30 minutes ago, The_Rev said:

I used to work with a Geordie bloke who insisted 'The South' started at South Shields.  

That's South Scotland though :mrgreen:

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26 minutes ago, bickster said:

That's South Scotland though :mrgreen:

Aye. You're all southerners to me.

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Accent had me lunging for pause, but it's pretty good this.

That you get the movement of individual divisions is neat.

Edited by Xann
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Magnetic north (in red) has wandered such that it is now pretty much directly in line with geographic north as viewed from Britain:

DMbBiPa.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Lichfield Dean said:

Magnetic north (in red) has wandered such that it is now pretty much directly in line with geographic north as viewed from Britain:

DMbBiPa.jpg

I hope the poles aren't about to flip (which will eventually happen) anytime soon. The effect on climate could be a bit dramatic. 

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1 hour ago, mjmooney said:

I hope the poles aren't about to flip (which will eventually happen) anytime soon. The effect on climate could be a bit dramatic. 

In what way?

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12 minutes ago, limpid said:

In what way?

Mea culpa. I've always understood it would cause climate problems. But a bit of research seems to indicate that this is not the case - although it seems that (for example) satellite communications could be adversely affected. 

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2 hours ago, mjmooney said:

I hope the poles aren't about to flip (which will eventually happen) anytime soon. The effect on climate could be a bit dramatic. 

I understand that the experts don't think this is indicative of a pole switch as the South pole isn't moving.

In fact, one guy supposedly thinks that the North pole is actually the sum of two magnetic hotspots, one under Canada and one under Siberia and that the moving of the pole we see here is simply the waxing and waning of those two areas in their respective strengths. Could be complete bunkum though.

The biggest problem with the pole switch is believed to be the collapse of the magnetosphere during the transition, opening the surface up to all sorts of nasty cosmic rays and radiation from the Sun. Would be a bad time for electronics I expect but a good time for the sunscreen manufacturers. 

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I'd be genuinely pissed off if I was a penguin and I had to up sticks and move all that way up north.

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4 minutes ago, Lichfield Dean said:

The biggest problem with the pole switch is believed to be the collapse of the magnetosphere during the transition, opening the surface up to all sorts of nasty cosmic rays and radiation from the Sun. Would be a bad time for electronics I expect but a good time for the sunscreen manufacturers. 

Believed by whom? I'm happy to be corrected, but 6,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000 kg of mass (mainly liquid iron) spinning is what generates the magnetosphere. It's not going to stop spinning.

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1 hour ago, limpid said:

Believed by whom? I'm happy to be corrected, but 6,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000 kg of mass (mainly liquid iron) spinning is what generates the magnetosphere. It's not going to stop spinning.

There is plenty of evidence in the geological record. The earth's magnetic field becomes unstable during the process of transition. The fields are generated as you say due to the iron motion in the core, but simulations show that this motion is basically unstable and occasionally it all goes nuts and you end up with the poles switching. The magnetosphere won't vanish entirely but it will be chaotic and can be hugely diminished during this time, which seems to be for around a hundred years or so. The fields always seem to strengthen back up afterwards fortunately.

 

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21 minutes ago, Lichfield Dean said:

There is plenty of evidence in the geological record. The earth's magnetic field becomes unstable during the process of transition. The fields are generated as you say due to the iron motion in the core, but simulations show that this motion is basically unstable and occasionally it all goes nuts and you end up with the poles switching. The magnetosphere won't vanish entirely but it will be chaotic and can be hugely diminished during this time, which seems to be for around a hundred years or so. The fields always seem to strengthen back up afterwards fortunately.

There is evidence of the magnetic poles flipping (and generally meandering around). What energy is going to overcome the inertia of that much mass spinning, because for the magnetosphere to diminish noticeably you need to add or remove energy to counteract that spin. What is that energy exchange mechanism?

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