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People on Mars


CrackpotForeigner
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According to some, people will be going to mars in the next ten years or so.

 

Personally I think there are too many reasons why this obvious idea is being considered about 100 years too early, technology-wise.

 

So I guess this thread is for discussing the technological and psychological requirements for getting people there and keeping them there.

 

Extra marks will be awarded for pointing out the many problems and possible solutions to them.

 

Ukk, ukk. I come in peace. Ukk ukk ukkk.

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Keeping them there won't be an issue. So that is that one solved.

 

You mean our current planet would be better off without people crazy enough to want to leave it?

 

In which case, I partly agree, but with added empathy for the lunatics in question - 'cause I'm such a good bloke an' that.

 

Does anyone think that a person could stay sane, watching Earth disappear into the distance forever? I don't.

 

Then there's the effect of the journey on the human body: Bones that weaken over a journey that would take longer than anyone's ever been in space for.

 

And they haven't yet designed a rocket anything like big enough to do the job of getting the people there, let alone the monumental amount of supplies they'd need to have a chance of surviving sane.

 

It's all a pipe dream imo, and I'm amazed it's even being seriously considered. Hope to hear from anyone who disagrees, along with their full, factual, reasoning.

Edited by CrackpotForeigner
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Then there's the effect of the journey on the human body: Bones that weaken over a journey that would take longer than anyone's ever been in space for.

 

Some Russian chap has done 14 continuous months in space which is long enough to pop to Mars and back. Think NASA have scrapped their plans to get there by 2030. 

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Some Russian chap has done 14 continuous months in space which is long enough to pop to Mars and back.

 

That's the sort of fact we need around here. There's a pretty good Wikipedia article on the subject (that I've just been reading): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manned_mission_to_Mars.

 

Another fact seems to be that the radiation danger isn't ridiculously high: A round trip is estimated to subject the travellers to 0.66 Sieverts, with the NASA HSE career limit of exposure being 1.0 Sievert.

 

So human psychology might be the biggest stumbling block after all.

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There's no rush. If everything goes according to plan, we'll get the first manned stations on there ~2080, which in turn would allow us to actually colonise the place by ~2100. By ~2150 we should be in a position to dig up the prothean ruins, get our hands on some element zero, develop FTL drives, and discover our local mass relay encased in ice orbiting Pluto, which is when the shit will really hit the fan.

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Since a colleague brought a bag of fun size Mars bars into work, I've been eating one a day, and far from helping me to work rest and play, I have been suffering from weight gain, mood swings and horrendous afternoon slumps. There's also this unquenchable thirst, but I'm sure that's nothing.

Edited by stwefano
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There's no rush. If everything goes according to plan, we'll get the first manned stations on there ~2080, which in turn would allow us to actually colonise the place by ~2100. By ~2150 we should be in a position to dig up the prothean ruins, get our hands on some element zero, develop FTL drives, and discover our local mass relay encased in ice orbiting Pluto, which is when the shit will really hit the fan.

Tell me another story about The Shepard.

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I think it should be done as soon as possible. 

Yes, there are massive risks, people will die (they know the risks beforehand), but it will open up a new chapter in human exploration.

 

Only way to know if it succeeds or not is to go for it!

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I think it should be done as soon as possible. 

Yes, there are massive risks, people will die (they know the risks beforehand), but it will open up a new chapter in human exploration.

 

Only way to know if it succeeds or not is to go for it!

 

As long as none of us has to volunteer.

 

The thing for me is that we're all just DNA anyway. I really think that what we should be doing is seeding primitive life forms around the universe as much as possible. I'd argue that's far more feasible than a mars colony - the Voyager 1 space probe launced in 1977 is already out of our solar system.

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There was a documentary on BBC4 last night called The Horizon Guide to Mars. Don't know if it inspired this thread but it should be available online. They have problems growing seeds in space, apparently they're only good for a few generations.

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There was a documentary on BBC4 last night called The Horizon Guide to Mars. Don't know if it inspired this thread but it should be available online. They have problems growing seeds in space, apparently they're only good for a few generations.

 

Thread "inspired" (thanks for choosing that word :)) by the article on the BBC news front page. Will look for the HGtoM. I guess the seeds have problems because of DNA damage due to radiation (?).

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Keeping them there won't be an issue. So that is that one solved.

 

You mean our current planet would be better off without people crazy enough to want to leave it?

 

In which case, I partly agree, but with added empathy for the lunatics in question - 'cause I'm such a good bloke an' that.

 

Does anyone think that a person could stay sane, watching Earth disappear into the distance forever? I don't.

 

Then there's the effect of the journey on the human body: Bones that weaken over a journey that would take longer than anyone's ever been in space for.

 

And they haven't yet designed a rocket anything like big enough to do the job of getting the people there, let alone the monumental amount of supplies they'd need to have a chance of surviving sane.

 

It's all a pipe dream imo, and I'm amazed it's even being seriously considered. Hope to hear from anyone who disagrees, along with their full, factual, reasoning.

No, I just mean there wouldn't be a way for them to get back. Once there they will be there for ever it's a one way ticket.

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