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6 minutes ago, Genie said:

Fortune favours the brave!

Do you have children? I often think “f**k it I’m gonna do something I enjoy” but as main bread winner, my wife does 16 hours and 2 children I just couldn’t cope with it failing.

Yes 3. It's a bold fecking move but it makes sense to me. Though I enjoy what I do at the minute, I don't want to be doing it at 50. 

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3 minutes ago, av1 said:

Yes 3. It's a bold fecking move but it makes sense to me. Though I enjoy what I do at the minute, I don't want to be doing it at 50. 

Go for it, and you’ll have the drive to make it work!

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I'm a security officer in a hospital, A duty manager role was advertised a few weeks ago which I applied for along with four acting duty managers. I have an interview next week in which I will need to give a presentation on managing and leading a new team. 

I've had a mooney and have some content to cover management and leadership over the first few slides before doing a swot analysis on the team I would be managing if I'm successful (one of the other candidates is nailed on). I'm struggling with the threats part of the analysis and what to end the presentation with.

Interview will have behavioural and scenario based questions. Behavioural I have some examples to draw from depending what is asked, but with the scenario based ones I only have the knowledge I have gained from asking other people in the role and reading up on company policies without the opportunity to put it into practice. Every other candidate has experience performing the role.

Does anyone have any advice for how I can bridge the gap in the interview?

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23 minutes ago, V01 said:

doing a swot analysis on the team I would be managing if I'm successful (one of the other candidates is nailed on). I'm struggling with the threats part of the analysis

If the SWOT is on your prospective team, then surely there are generic threats - the potential for people to leave, meaning you'd be short handed. Ditto illness. Then there's the potential (when anyone gets promoted) for people to feel they've been overlooked or to be resentful of the one who's just been promoted - so there's be dealing with that - what would you do - how would you deal with it and so on. You'll surely know other problems or potential problems in the team, or similar teams you've worked with - giving details of what you've experienced would be a plus in an interview - even if it's just about how different styles of "leadership" have motivated/de-motivated you, or others in teams you've worked with/in - stress from the Covid situation must be a thing?...etc.  - for example "i've noticed this...and I'd be mindful of not doing that, instead doing such and such ...in similar situations...."Good luck

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I did put staff turnover and covid isolations down as placeholders while I tried to come up with something else, maybe I'm not as dumb as I look. 

 

Thinking of putting something in about being the manager I wish I had, trying to build a positive culture and looking for ways to inspire/motivate staff to improve their performance rather than resort to punitive actions when they make mistakes.

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14 minutes ago, V01 said:

I did put staff turnover and covid isolations down as placeholders while I tried to come up with something else, maybe I'm not as dumb as I look. 

Thinking of putting something in about being the manager I wish I had, trying to build a positive culture and looking for ways to inspire/motivate staff to improve their performance rather than resort to punitive actions when they make mistakes.

That's good. Something to think about would be [if I were your interviewer, I'd want to hear something on the lines of]: If you say you would try to build a positive culture and looking for ways to inspire/motivate staff to improve their performance rather than resort to punitive actions when they make mistakes., then that's great, But I'd think to myself "is this person a pushover for sloppy staff?" so I'd want to hear what underlines that approach - for example "I (you) would try to understand what had led to the mistake being made, and then determine a course of action based around that - the person making the mistake may have been let down/not trained in [whatever]/a repeat mistake maker/having trouble at home/tired due to long shifts... - address the underlying cause not the react only on the effect (mistake) type of thing, to prevent future instances....

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To expand on what I said cover how I feel it would reduce occurrences of poor performance and explain how I'd look for causes rather than assigning blame. Being open to treating failures as learning opportunities and then touch on a time where it hasn't worked and I've had to be more authoritive.

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5 hours ago, V01 said:

I'm a security officer in a hospital, A duty manager role was advertised a few weeks ago which I applied for along with four acting duty managers. I have an interview next week in which I will need to give a presentation on managing and leading a new team. 

I've had a mooney and have some content to cover management and leadership over the first few slides before doing a swot analysis on the team I would be managing if I'm successful (one of the other candidates is nailed on). I'm struggling with the threats part of the analysis and what to end the presentation with.

Interview will have behavioural and scenario based questions. Behavioural I have some examples to draw from depending what is asked, but with the scenario based ones I only have the knowledge I have gained from asking other people in the role and reading up on company policies without the opportunity to put it into practice. Every other candidate has experience performing the role.

Does anyone have any advice for how I can bridge the gap in the interview?

Just because you’ve never led a team before, doesn’t mean you haven’t shown leadership qualities. So try to think of these and then build on them for the scenarios. I’d imagine the scenario will be something like, “tell us about a time when you’ve led a team”. So you could say how you were working with others and some of them didn’t know what to do, so you gave them guidance and acted as a mentor. Obviously I’m just generalising, but that shows how whilst not being a leader you are demonstrating leadership skills 

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11 hours ago, Xela said:

Good luck @V01 but what you have posted makes me mad at what they ask people to do in job interviews. Presentations and scenario based questions. What happened to just speaking to people and getting a feel for them? Especially if you work there already. 

Fluffy questions like "Give me an example of when you have collaborated with other departments to reach a common goal?" or "Tell me about a time your decision making has been questioned and how that made you feel?". Just nothing questions. 

Sorry, rant over :) 

I’m with you @Xela

When I was hunting for a job a few years back I was initially a bit flummoxed by those questions. After a few interviews it was clear they all ask them and the hardest part was making it look like you weren’t expecting the question when reeling off the stock answer.

Oh, a time when I had to make a decision without all the information, let me just think for a second...

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9 hours ago, Genie said:

I’m with you @Xela

When I was hunting for a job a few years back I was initially a bit flummoxed by those questions. After a few interviews it was clear they all ask them and the hardest part was making it look like you weren’t expecting the question when reeling off the stock answer.

Oh, a time when I had to make a decision without all the information, let me just think for a second...

If you go for a job interview externally, you can just make up answers - they can't be verified. 

The job ends up going to the person who can game the interview the best, rather than asking people about their experience and what they can offer. 

As you can see, I don't interview well! 

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14 hours ago, Xela said:

If you go for a job interview externally, you can just make up answers - they can't be verified. 

The job ends up going to the person who can game the interview the best, rather than asking people about their experience and what they can offer. 

As you can see, I don't interview well! 

Yep my company use these types of interviews and they really frustrate me. I’ve had to do some of them as part of a recruitment push and even when asking them the questions they aren’t enjoyable or worthy 

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15 hours ago, Xela said:

If you go for a job interview externally, you can just make up answers - they can't be verified. 

The job ends up going to the person who can game the interview the best, rather than asking people about their experience and what they can offer. 

As you can see, I don't interview well! 

It frustrates the hell out of me. Not only as someone that doesn't interview well, but when interviewing too. I've often had some interview well but you just know that they are not going to be the best candidate for the job. I worked somewhere that was very transparent on interview scoring. There was one section which you could use to bump up the score of someone you felt was better for the role but sometimes it you just had to go with the one that was better at answering the questions.

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16 hours ago, Xela said:

If you go for a job interview externally, you can just make up answers - they can't be verified. 

The job ends up going to the person who can game the interview the best, rather than asking people about their experience and what they can offer. 

As you can see, I don't interview well! 

I think this is, er, a bit flawed. People can lie when they talk about their experience, or whether they talk about that time when they experienced such and such a scenario.

Being good (or not) at interviews is probably aided if the interviewee is asked to talk about their experiences, and making the questions relevant to the role they are applying for is no bad thing. Giving presentations (if the role is for leadership or communication is a good thing to assess particular skills.

That said, an awful lot of interviewers are really poor at it. I had an absolute car crash of an interview maybe 14 months ago - it was one where people who wanted to go and work in a particular other Country (Oz) submitted their CVs, which were then filtered and those who potentially fitted vacant roles were interviewed - I fitted, so got an interview. I didn't know what specific role I was being interviewed for, the Interviewer who was a very senior bod, ( I felt) didn't know or couldn't explain what the lower level role she was looking for someone to do, actually was - in part because she hadn't worked there for long (6 months) and had come from a different industry altogether. So we spent about 30 minutes talking at complete cross purposes about my experiences with "autonomy" which I'd assumed she meant was around Model based and computational Engineering (as she'd specifically mentioned it), which I don't like and didn't want to do as a job, and she was talking about autonomy in terms of unmanned aircraft computing (which I do like and would have done as a job) - by the time the penny dropped between us that we were discussing different things, I think we'd both decided "No, not for me, this one". The thing is that they were desperate for people to fill vacant roles and I was keen to go. So utter car-crash all round.

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The worst interview I had was about 2 years ago at a company in Telford. The recruitment company put me through to the interview but the interviewer interviewed for a different job. I sit down and talk about the technical aspects of my job and relevant experience but the questions didn’t match. I couldn’t answer them. After 20 minutes the interview ended and I am scratching my head. The feedback was they felt I knew nothing about the role. A week later I got more feedback that they wanted a **** developer and my CV full of test experience was submitted in error. It was handy as the interviewer who would have been my department head was an absolute word removed. His opening gambit was the building was formally occupied by Cap Gemini and they were a useless bunch of cowboys. Sadly he never looked at my experience which would have said 2001 to 2008. Cap Gemini. 
 

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I've been interviewed for the same job 3 times in the last month, after they saw my CV on LinkedIn.

First interview was an informal chat about the job, and it was said I'd be working for that company for 6 months and then once my probation was completed, I would be TUPD over to the actual job, which I was very wary of because I'm very happy with my current role, the team (but I'm underpaid somewhat, but in fairness, my current company are willing to fund my training this year and then have a chat in 6 months or so).

Second interview was with the same guy and the MD, which was fine, but very disorganised from their perspective.  It was quite awkward and ambled along.  Feedback was great and MD see's me as "one for the future".. that's good.  Found out the original job had changed and I'd be much more secure, which is good.

Third interview was with original guy plus 2 of the team I'd be working with, went ok, fine.  Finished with the guy asking me if I wanted the job or was flogging a dead horse.  Told him the offer would have to be right and that I was in no rush to leave my current job.

Thing is, the new job would be a nearly 50% raise, which is something I'm not used to, but there would be added pressure and responsibilities obviously.  My wife seems pretty convinced I should just "take it", and while I kinda agree, because the wages I'm on now aren't terrible, but about 5k under acceptable, I'm very happy in my current role, I'm doing a good job and I'm in a nice position.  If I go for the big bucks, new company will obviously expect me to excel, which I'm not sure I'll be able to.

Not even been offered yet, but I know what I'd need for me to say yes.  Then I'm not sure about how I'd go about taking that offer to my current employer and saying "match it.

Unknown territory really! 

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8 hours ago, lapal_fan said:

Not even been offered yet, but I know what I'd need for me to say yes.  Then I'm not sure about how I'd go about taking that offer to my current employer and saying "match it.

I wouldn’t outright say match it, I’d say that you’ve found another job and you’re considering it. They obviously ask why, then you say that the pay offer is on a par with what you believe you’re worth and the current role is well under.

Ball in their court.

If you say “match it or I’m off” it could put their backs up and also open the door for others to issue the same ultimatum. It’s best if they think it’s their idea to offer you something.

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I finished my presentation over the weekend along with a brief outline of what I want to say during each slide. Dry run later to iron out any kinks then got the next couple of days in work to brush up on things.

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Had my interview earlier. Started with my presentation and nerves got the better of me, I fluffed a line and got the giggles ended up taking me 4 or 5 attempts to put my point across. It kinda of shook my confidence and I rushed the next few slides. I made a lot of good points and had a cohesive message on the slides. Delivery could have been a lot better though.

The questions following the presentation threw me a little as of expected other topics to be brought up, answered the best I could but I think that was the weakest part.

 

I had 4 situational questions which I felt like I nailed, surprising tye interviewer with the amount of knowledge I had about a job I haven't done.

I then had 3 behavioural questions, two of which I hadn't expected. I had examples ready which fit two of the questions and the 3rd I winged with an experience I had in a previous job that seemed relevant.

Asked a few questions at the end. Then a brief chat before leaving. Walked out and remembered a myriad of things I had wanted to say.

Decision should be made by Monday.

 

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