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AstonMartyn88

What is your experience of mental health?

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I obviously don't know how debilitating it is and excuse my ignorance on it (I mean well) but are you ever able to overcome it in a defiant way, even briefly? Or are you sure that 'accepting it' is the only option?

 

I always used to think it was people feeling sorry for themselves in regard to depression until i had it myself i could not believe it when the doctor said i had it i thought i had anaemia diabetes or something physically wrong with me as i felt extremely tired all the time but according to doctor it was because i did too much exercise with not enough rest

 

I don't think ive ever felt so awful before just getting out of bed in the morning was a challenge i think id rather have the flu than it

Edited by AshVilla

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but are you ever able to overcome it in a defiant way, even briefly?

Not that I am aware of. Sometimes I can have a few (not too many!!!) beers and relax or play a good round of golf or something but most (maybe all) of the time those experiences just leave you with a bizarre emptiness rather than any happiness. Part of the condition is that you become very goal focused in an attempt to feel happiness but as soon as you achieve those goals there's nothing. Just a blank and it's impossible not to be conscious of the fact that your missing a key component of life (happiness) that other people get. As an example I can't remember anything that makes me happy, so if someone says to you name your happiest memory, I have none. I can't tell any stories about good times or any great shared memories.

As you can imagine it's not easy to describe, basically the part of my brain that's supposed to make me happy and give me positive re-enforcement doesn't work. You can't fake it, it's not a phobia or an addiction that can be overcome it's just something missing.

Respect for speaking so candidly. It must be very difficult.

I'm wondering whether other emotions are affected such as shame, which might stop one from talking about their condition.

I was on Citalopram for 18 months a couple of years back during a crippling period of depression. It saved my life in my opinion, but it left me with a very similar emotional reaction to events as villa89. I turned into a rampant sex addict, constantly looking for a fix. I rarely got it. I functioned properly, laughed and cried along with everyone else but it was mostly instinctual. I was driven towards my goals (especially when on the "hunt") but never really focussed as such, it all felt a little bit out of body.

I did lose many inhibitions as a consequence. I opened myself up to experiences and that has been helpful post recovery. I'm more "me" now than I ever was before, I learnt a lot about myself even though I wasn't always aware of that at the time.

Keep rolling villa89. They're making massive strides in understanding the brain. You're a young man, they'll find what's missing and you'll have the life you deserve.

Much love to you.

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I have been diagnosed with a condition called Dysthymia ...

 

Did the diagnosis help? By which I mean now that you know what you are dealing with, now that you are aware of it, could you then attempt to consciously try to overcome it? Almost make it the enemy that won't beat you?

 

 

I am hoping that knowing more about what's wrong with me will help me to accept it and cope with it in the future. I look at other people enviously but guess you just have to play the hand you're dealt. Too bad I was dealt 7-2 off suit (hold'em reference). Maybe in the future things will improve but for now I just live day to day. There's definitely no beating it, it's a major part of who I am and I can't escape it. I have had it since puberty and will have it until the end of my days. I think learning a way to manage it is the best case scenario.

 

I too have been diagnosed with the same thing villa89 yet there is hope.

 

As previously stated in the thread I take care of someone who is also suffering from a mental illness and doing that has made me get out of bed to earn a living because that other person was relying on me to do so.

 

I had responsibility and even in my very worst moments that responsibility and a fair amount of counseling drove me outside the bubble of depression. It is still however a constant battle and although I don't work now I keep myself in the same routine of getting up early rather than allowing myself to slip.

 

This is not meant in anyway to sound patronising but as my counselor told me there does come a time when it is up to you.

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I was once asked by a therapist, "What gives you joy?" I realised that the answer was, "Nothing. Ever."

 

Boat. Same.

 

 

Villa fans. It figures. 

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It seems nearly everyone on this forum has a story to tell. Perhaps there is a correlation between people who spend a lot of time on internet forums having anxiety/depression in 'the real world'?

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The amount of children with SEN (Special Educational Needs) just in our school is staggering.

 

I think we're heading towards a society where far more autism, aspergers and other needs are going to be diagnosed more frequently. From working with children every day, you get used to spotting autistic traits and so many undiagnosed adults have them; just because we've made strides in getting that diagnosis fairly recently and we can do more to help.

 

With regards to myself, definitely ADHD but never diagnosed. Had quite severe anxiety when I was 18; came back 2 months ago and is gone again. Episodic really.

Edited by StefanAVFC

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The amount of children with SEN (Special Educational Needs) just in our school is staggering.

 

I think we're heading towards a society where far more autism, aspergers and other needs are going to be diagnosed more frequently.

I agree, my Mum is a teacher at a primary school and she says the rates at which children that are classified as having Special Educational Needs is rising rapidly. But she does say that some of the children who are classified as having Special Educational Needs are just generally unruly and are badly behaved. 

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Autism =/= bad behaviour though.

 

I think more are diagnosed as ADHD/ADD now, which 'excuses' the behaviour (so to speak) but we've got better at spotting autism now as well.

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It seems nearly everyone on this forum has a story to tell. Perhaps there is a correlation between people who spend a lot of time on internet forums having anxiety/depression in 'the real world'?

I don't think that's the case - not even sure what you really mean there, Geoff.

Perhaps there's a correlation between the kind of people who would get to feel comfortable talking in the off topic area of this kind of forum and those who would also feel comfortable talking about their own experiences with regard to mental health issues?

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It seems nearly everyone on this forum has a story to tell. Perhaps there is a correlation between people who spend a lot of time on internet forums having anxiety/depression in 'the real world'?

I don't think that's the case - not even sure what you really mean there, Geoff.

Perhaps there's a correlation between the kind of people who would get to feel comfortable talking in the off topic area of this kind of forum and those who would also feel comfortable talking about their own experiences with regard to mental health issues?

 

 

I count a handful of people talking about their experiences from a forum of thousands. Perhaps the openness and the candidness of the the posts in this thread is thanks to the sense of community we've built here, but living in the "real world" as is my want from time to time I don't think what we're seeing in here is too unusual. I know lots of people who have either suffered from or know somebody who has suffered from mental health issues. Maybe it's just the circles I mix in but on those rare occasions I myself start talking when the topic comes up I'm always surprised by those that have and haven't had problems themselves. 

 

One of my house mates is depressed right now, another has a brother who suffers from acute OCD as well as something similar to villa89 and Morpheus. I myself am bound to therapy of some form until the day I do (through choice granted). It's thanks to discussions like this that people are able to face these issues head on. 

 

Maybe to some internet forums are an escapism thing. That might skew the data, if there is any. But i also think there's a level of trust born from relative anonymity as well as the aforementioned community aspect. The fact that we're "mates" in here helps too.

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Here's a good pic for this thread.

If physical diseases were treated like mental illness

CWFTYoV.png

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I saw that cartoon on FB too. And it sort of ties in with my equating physical and mental illness a couple of pages back. 

 

Although I would qualify it. In the less serious cases, you CAN treat yourself with a "get a grip" attitude - just as you can treat your own minor physical ailments with exercise, rest, or massage, etc. 

 

If it gets more serious, it's then that you can't self-treat, and you need medical intervention. 

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Autism fascinates me.

Read "the reason I jump". Written by a 12 year old Japanese autistic kid. I'm a teacher and use it as a bible when dealing with autistic kids in my school. He basically gives reasons for his behaviour and what goes through his mind.. Fascinating stuff.

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Autism fascinates me.

Read "the reason I jump". Written by a 12 year old Japanese autistic kid. I'm a teacher and use it as a bible when dealing with autistic kids in my school. He basically gives reasons for his behaviour and what goes through his mind.. Fascinating stuff.

 

 

 

Nice one mate will definitely check that out.

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I was on Citalopram for 18 months a couple of years back during a crippling period of depression.

 Finally getting off that, in fact in the last two years I've weaned myself off them almost totally.

 

I found citalopram no good at all unless handcuffed to mirtazapine. That did the trick.

 

Before that I was on some type of drug or another for the best part of 20 years.

 

Yes, jolly old me! ;)

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Here is my contribution to this thread. I had a very difficult time from 2001-2005 with people making my life very difficult. I was picked on at Grammar School for being dumb amongst other things and then certain people gave me grief for no reason about my mother getting run over. I have mentioned this on the forum before, some of you may remember. The result of all this is that I suffered depression for many years. When I tried to talk to people about it the end result was always 'get over it' 'move on from the past'. But my question is how do you get over it. My mind is almost better now, but unless you've had depression or any mental illness you don't understand how bad it is. People still don't take mental illness seriously.

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Sertraline for me at the moment. Rob did you find that on mirtazapine you spend every waking hour obsessing about food?

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What has bought on the depression for most people? Was it something bad that happened to you when you were young?

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